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CTA Source Images as a Predictor of Final Infarct Volume are Time-Dependent

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2016

Dylan Blacquiere*
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine — Division of Neurology, The University of Ottawa
Miguel Bussière
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine — Division of Neurology, The University of Ottawa Department of Diagnostic Imaging — Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology Section, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Cheemun Lum
Affiliation:
Department of Diagnostic Imaging — Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology Section, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Dar Dowlatshahi
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine — Division of Neurology, The University of Ottawa
*
Department of Medicine — Division of Neurology, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, Room 2196b, 1053 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario, K1Y 4E9, Canada
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Avascularity on CT angiography source images (CTASI) may better predict final infarct volume in acute stroke as compared to early ischemic changes on non-contract CT. These CTASI findings may represent infarct core and help determine the extent of salvageable tissue. However, the extent of avascularity on CTASI may overestimate infarct volume if transit of contrast is prolonged due to proximal artery occlusion. We present a case where CT-perfusion (CTP) and time-resolved CT-angiography (CTA) identified salvageable tissue thought to be infarcted on CTASI.

Type
Neuroimaging Highlights
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological 2010

References

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