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We are the world’s leading publisher in language and linguistics, with a wide-ranging list of journals and books covering the scope of this discipline. Our publishing encompasses theoretical, applied and sociolinguistics, and represents a breadth of subfields, including grammar and syntax, phonetics and phonology, semantics and pragmatics, historical linguistics, discourse and conversation analysis, psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics, and first and second language acquisition. Our acclaimed book list includes state-of-the-art monographs as well as major reference works, guides to research methods, and textbooks at all levels.

Languages & Linguistics blog

  • Introducing Cambridge Elements in Pragmatics
  • 02 June 2020, Rachel
  • Cambridge Elements combine the best features of journals and books. With a word count between 20,000-30,000 words they lend themselves to the digital and ever changing research environment. A series coming soon to linguistics is Elements in Pragmatics edited by Jonathan Culpeper, Lancaster University and Michael Haugh, University of Queensland. Cambridge Extra asked them more about the series. What motivated you to collate this Elements series? The format itself is really appealing. It is longer than typical journal articles but shorter than a monograph, so is ideal for both graduate students and established researchers in the field. It also allows authors to publish their work at its natural length, if an article is too constraining yet a full book is over the horizon. Its digital format means the . . . → Read More: Introducing Cambridge Elements in Pragmatics...
  • Cambridge Reflections: Covid-19
  • 12 May 2020, Rachel
  • Written by Alex Wright, Senior Executive Publisher and Head of Humanities at Cambridge University Press The coronavirus and its challenges of immediacy have thrown into sharp relief the apparent disjuncture between intellectual endeavour and what a society goes through in the grip of a pestilence. When the difference between life and death is measured in terms of having enough ventilators in hospitals, or adequate PPE, should we even be talking about characterisation in Shakespeare? It is right to ask such a question, and proper too to give priority to what people need to do to survive the present emergency. But a moment of crisis helps us to see that we live out our lives perpetually threatened by loss; and gives us space . . . → Read More: Cambridge Reflections: Covid-19...
  • ELT and me: A story with no history?
  • 30 April 2020, Rachel
  • Written by Michael McCarthy I was recently invited to contribute an article to the CUP journal Language Teaching, looking back over my career as an English language teacher, applied linguist and academic. In a strange sort of way, I discovered my own history by writing about it, a truly pleasurable experience. But in doing so, I realised how much I had lacked a proper historical perspective during most of my fifty-odd years in the profession. Great changes have happened during that half-century, and they happened all around me as I soldiered on, blissfully ignorant of the ideas that were pushing the profession forward. My career started in the mid-1960s, when structuralism was popular in language teaching, alongside traditional Latin-modelled grammar-translation approaches, and most . . . → Read More: ELT and me: A story with no history?...