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A lack of credible evidence for a relationship between socio-economic status and dietary patterns: a response to ‘Associations between socio-economic status and dietary patterns in US black and white adults’

  • Edward Archer (a1)
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      A lack of credible evidence for a relationship between socio-economic status and dietary patterns: a response to ‘Associations between socio-economic status and dietary patterns in US black and white adults’
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References

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1. Kell, KP, Judd, SE, Pearson, KE, et al. (2015) Associations between socio-economic status and dietary patterns in US black and white adults. Br J Nutr 113, 17921799.
2. Archer, E, Pavela, G & Lavie, CJ (2015) The inadmissibility of what we eat in America and NHANES dietary data in nutrition and obesity research and the scientific formulation of national dietary guidelines. Mayo Clin Proc 90, 911926.
3. Lissner, L, Troiano, RP, Midthune, D, et al. (2007) OPEN about obesity: recovery biomarkers, dietary reporting errors and BMI. Int J Obes (Lond) 31, 956961.
4. Archer, E, Hand, GA & Blair, SN (2013) Validity of U.S. nutritional surveillance: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey caloric energy intake data, 1971-2010. PLOS ONE 8, e76632.
5. Black, AE (2000) Critical evaluation of energy intake using the Goldberg cut-off for energy intake: basal metabolic rate. A practical guide to its calculation, use and limitations. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 24, 11191130.
6. Archer, E & Blair, SN (2015) Implausible data, false memories, and the status quo in dietary assessment. Adv Nutr 6, 229230.
7. Archer, E & Blair, SN (2015) Reply to LS Freedman et al. Adv Nutr 6, 489490.
8. Lara, JJ, Scott, JA & Lean, ME (2004) Intentional mis-reporting of food consumption and its relationship with body mass index and psychological scores in women. J Hum Nutr Diet 17, 209218.

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