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Longitudinal symptom network structure in first-episode psychosis: a possible marker for remission

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2021

Yan Hong Piao
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Republic of Korea Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, Korea
Je-Yeon Yun
Affiliation:
Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Yeongeon Student Support Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Thong Ba Nguyen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Republic of Korea Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, Korea
Woo-Sung Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Republic of Korea Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, Korea
Jing Sui
Affiliation:
Brainnetome Center and National Laboratory of Pattern Recognition, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
Nam-In Kang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Maeumsarang Hospital, Wanju, Jeollabuk-do, Korea
Keon-Hak Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Maeumsarang Hospital, Wanju, Jeollabuk-do, Korea
Seunghyong Ryu
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea
Sung-Wan Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea
Bong Ju Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Republic of Korea
Jung Jin Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Je-Chun Yu
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
Kyu Young Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji General Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Seung-Hee Won
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea
Seung-Hwan Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Republic of Korea
Seung-Hyun Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Korea University College of Medicine, Guro Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Shi Hyun Kang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Euitae Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea
Young Chul Chung
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Republic of Korea Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, Korea
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background

Network approach has been applied to a wide variety of psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present study was to identify network structures of remitters and non-remitters in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) at baseline and the 6-month follow-up.

Methods

Participants (n = 252) from the Korean Early Psychosis Study (KEPS) were enrolled. They were classified as remitters or non-remitters using Andreasen's criteria. We estimated network structure with 10 symptoms (three symptoms from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, one depressive symptom, and six symptoms related to schema and rumination) as nodes using a Gaussian graphical model. Global and local network metrics were compared within and between the networks over time.

Results

Global network metrics did not differ between the remitters and non-remitters at baseline or 6 months. However, the network structure and nodal strengths associated with positive-self and positive-others scores changed significantly in the remitters over time. Unique central symptoms for remitters and non-remitters were cognitive brooding and negative-self, respectively. The correlation stability coefficients for nodal strength were within the acceptable range.

Conclusion

Our findings indicate that network structure and some nodal strengths were more flexible in remitters. Negative-self could be an important target for therapeutic intervention.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Longitudinal symptom network structure in first-episode psychosis: a possible marker for remission
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