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The Faint Young Sun and Faint Young Stars Paradox

  • Petrus C. Martens (a1)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore a resolution for the Faint Young Sun Paradox that has been mostly rejected by the community, namely the possibility of a somewhat more massive young Sun with a large mass loss rate sustained for two to three billion years. This would make the young Sun bright enough to keep both the terrestrial and Martian oceans from freezing, and thus resolve the paradox. It is found that a large and sustained mass loss is consistent with the well observed spin-down rate of Sun-like stars, and indeed may be required for it. It is concluded that a more massive young Sun must be considered a plausible hypothesis.

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References

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The Faint Young Sun and Faint Young Stars Paradox

  • Petrus C. Martens (a1)

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