Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Infant and child mortality in Bangladesh

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

Ruhul Amin
Affiliation:
Institute for Urban Research, Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Summary

Socioeconomic differences and trends in infant and child mortality in Bangladesh are examined using data from the 1975 World Fertility Survey and 1979 Contraceptive Prevalence Survey. There is evidence of some recent decline in infant and child mortality. Logit analysis of infant and child mortality indicates that sociodemographic variables such as mother's education, recent period, or higher birth orders, had significant independent effects upon the reduction of infant and child mortality. Other variables such as fetal loss, father's education, or land ownership had no consistent significant effect of upon infant and child mortality. On the other hand, the effect of urban residence on infant and child mortality was positive after the control of the sociodemographic variables. Mere concentration on the supply of modern medical services may bring limited returns unless they are reinforced by appropriate social changes, in particular those affecting the socioeconomic status of women.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1988

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Amin, R., Mariam, A. G. & Faruqee, R. (1985) Fertility, contraceptive use, and socioeconomic context in Bangladesh. Demography India, 14, 1.Google Scholar
Amin, R., Mariam, A. G. & Faruqee, R. (1986) Infant and child mortality in Bangladesh, 1959–1976. Demography India, 15, 24.Google Scholar
Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (1984) Bangladesh Population Census, 1981: Analytical Findings and National Tables. Dhaka, Bangladesh.Google Scholar
Bangladesh Government (1981) Bangladesh Contraceptive Prevalence Survey — 1979. Dhaka, Bangladesh.Google Scholar
Caldwell, J. C. (1986) Routes to low mortality in poor countries. Popul. Dev. Rev. 12, 171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coale, A. J. & Demeny, P. (1966) Regional Model Life Tables and Stable Populations. Princeton University Press, Princeton.Google Scholar
Goodman, L. A. (1972) A modified multiple regression approach to the analysis of dichotomous variables. Am. social. Rev. 37, 28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Khan, M. A., Das, A. M. & Rahman, M. K. (1983) Morbidity and Mortality Survey on Diarrhoeal Diseases. Government of Bangladesh, Dhaka.Google Scholar
National Research Council (1981) Estimation of Recent Trends in Fertility and Mortality in Bangladesh. Report No. 5, NRC, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
Northrup, R. S. (1973) Health manpower and organization. In: Disaster in Bangladesh. Edited by Cher, L.. Oxford University Press, New York.Google Scholar
Robinson, W. C. (Ed.) (1985) The Fertility Impact of Development Programmes in Bangladesh. Planning Commission, Dhaka, Bangladesh.Google Scholar
United Nations (1983) Manual X: Indirect Techniques for Demographic Estimation. Population Studies No. 81, UN, New York.Google Scholar
US Bureau of the Census (1982) Country Demographic Profiles — Bangladesh. Washington, DC.Google Scholar
World Fertility Survey (1979) The Bangladesh Fertility Survey, 1975: A Summary of Findings. International Institute, Voorburg, Netherlands.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 18 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 19th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-76cb886bbf-pdn9z Total loading time: 0.385 Render date: 2021-01-19T18:52:13.934Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Infant and child mortality in Bangladesh
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Infant and child mortality in Bangladesh
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Infant and child mortality in Bangladesh
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *