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  • ISSN: 0714-9808 (Print), 1710-1107 (Online)
  • Editor: Dr Pierrette Gaudreau
  • Editorial board
The Canadian Journal on Aging/La Revue canadienne du vieillissement (CJA/RCV) promotes excellence in research and disseminates the latest work of researchers in the social sciences, humanities, health and biological sciences who study the older population of Canada and other countries; informs policy debates relevant to aging through the publication of the highest quality research; seeks to improve the quality of life for Canada's older population and for older populations in other parts of the world through the publication of research that focuses on the broad range of relevant issues from income security to family relationships to service delivery and best practices; and encourages the exchange of the latest ideas in gerontological research through the publication of work by international scholars to the benefit of the Canadian and international scholarly communities as well as older adults in Canada and around the world.

Call for Nominations and Applications

The Canadian Journal on Aging / La Revue canadienne du vieillissement is seeking nominations or applications to fill several positions on the Editorial Board. These include: Health Sciences and Biological Sciences, Psychology, Social Sciences and Social Policy and Practice Section Editors.

Appointment to the Editorial Board is normally for a four-year term. Nominations and applications are currently being accepted.

Click here for more information.


Open Access

The Canadian Journal on Aging/ La Revue canadienne du vieillissement (CJA/RCV) is committed to supporting fair access to scholarship. In line with the SSHRC open access policy, all CJA/RCV content from 2019 onwards will be available for free online subject to a 12-month embargo. This policy means that all articles will be made free to access, with no paywall, 12 months after they have been published in an issue on Cambridge Core. The journal’s other open access policies, including manuscript archiving via Green Open Access, remain unchanged. 


May Article of the Month

Assistive Device Use among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Profile of Canadians Using Hearing, Vision, and Mobility Devices in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging

Yoko Ishigami, Jeffrey Jutai and Susan kirkland

Abstract

There is increasing recognition that using assistive devices can support healthy aging. Minimizing discomfort and loss of function and increasing independence can have a substantial impact physically, psychologically, and financially on persons with functional impairments and resulting activity limitations, as well as on caregivers and communities. However, it remains unclear who uses assistive devices and how device use can influence social participation. The current analysis used CLSA baseline data from 51,338 older adults between the ages of 45 and 85. Measures of socio-demographic, health, and social characteristics were analyzed by sex and age groups. Weighted cross-tabulations were used to report correlations between independent variables and assistive device use for hearing, vision, and mobility. We found that assistive device use was higher among those who were of older age, had less education, were widowed, had lower income, and had poorer health. Assistive devices were used differently according to sex and social participation, providing insight into assistive device use for the well-being of older adults and their families.

summary

It is increasingly recognized that the use of technical aids can promote healthy aging. The minimization of discomfort and loss of function, as well as the improvement of autonomy, can have a significant physical, psychological and financial impact on people with functional impairments, on the activity limitations that result from them. , caregivers and communities. However, little data is available on the use of assistive devices by individuals and the influence of this use on social participation. The present study consists of an analysis of baseline CLSA data from 51,338 people aged 45 to 85 years. Measures associated with socio-demographic characteristics, health and social issues were analyzed according to gender and age group. Weighted cross-tabulations illustrate the correlations between the independent variables and the use of technical aids for hearing, vision and mobility. We found that assistive technology use was higher among older, less educated, widowed, lower income, and less healthy people. The use of technical aids presented differences related to gender and social participation. This study highlights the importance of the use of technical aids for the well-being of the elderly and their families. vision and mobility. We found that assistive technology use was higher among older, less educated, widowed, lower income, and less healthy people. The use of technical aids presented differences related to gender and social participation. This study highlights the importance of the use of technical aids for the well-being of the elderly and their families. vision and mobility. We found that assistive technology use was higher among older, less educated, widowed, lower income, and less healthy people. The use of technical aids presented differences related to gender and social participation. This study highlights the importance of the use of technical aids for the well-being of the elderly and their families.


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Issues of Aging in Indigenous Populations - a forthcoming special issue