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Cambridge is one of the world’s leading publishers of research in classical studies, with a list that covers all aspects of enquiry into the ancient world. Our books are at the forefront of the discipline and have been recognised for their broad-ranging, thought-provoking scholarship. Our publishing spans the full range of classical enquiry and pedagogy: critical editions of ancient texts, commentaries, literary and historical analysis, classical archaeology, theoretical perspectives, reception studies, course texts, companions and source books.
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Classical Studies - Journals blog

  • What Makes a Good Book Review?
  • 20 July 2023, Dr Gesine Manuwald, Dr Greta Hawes and Dr Blanka Misic
  • Classical Review publishes hundreds of reviews every year. The books reviewed in our journal run the full range of topics related to antiquity and its reception;...

Classical Studies - Books blog

  • Two Soviet Humorists’ Extraordinary American Road Trip
  • 22 February 2024, Lisa A. Kirschenbaum
  • In 1935, just two years after the normalization of Soviet American relations, Pravda sent two humorists to the United States as reporters and cultural ambassadors. The post Two Soviet Humorists’ Extraordinary American Road Trip first appeared on Fifteen Eighty Four | Cambridge University Press....
  • WHEN FRENCH HISTORIANS CONQUERED THE WORLD: THE FUNERAL ORATION AFTER NICOLE LORAUX
  • 13 February 2024, David M. Pritchard
  • French people are often surprised that foreigners come to France to study ancient Greece. It is easy for them to understand why foreign philosophers might go The post WHEN FRENCH HISTORIANS CONQUERED THE WORLD: THE FUNERAL ORATION AFTER NICOLE LORAUX first appeared on Fifteen Eighty Four | Cambridge University Press....
  • The Challenge of John Herschel
  • 06 February 2024, Stephen Case
  • When I want to introduce people to the nineteenth-century polymath John Herschel (1792–1871), sometimes it’s difficult to know where to begin. There are simply The post The Challenge of John Herschel first appeared on Fifteen Eighty Four | Cambridge University Press....


Color Us Greek

While it’s too much to imagine that those endlessly fascinating Greek ancestors of ours were color-blind, they most certainly were keen on marking difference, linguistically and geographically. But what about “racially?” What was “blackness” to a citizen of Ancient Greece, and what did the blackness of Sub-Saharan Africans, in fact, signify? And what in the world did an “Ethiopian” such as Memnon, whose people were favored by the gods, appear to be physically in the Greek imagination? Speculation about such complex matters has never elicited more energetic speculation and wishful thinking from scholars, journalists, and filmmakers than today, who inevitably read Greek attitudes toward physical differences through the lens of black-white race relations in the West today. Which is why Sarah Derbew’s Untangling Blackness in Greek Antiquity is a most welcome corrective to the school of Afrocentricity that would paint even Greek-descended Cleopatra black. Bringing deep learning and calm, convincing reasoning to a politically-loaded subject is always difficult. But Professor Derbew accomplishes this task with eloquence, grace, and hard-hitting analytical skills that make this book must reading for all of us who long to know how racial differences manifested themselves in the sublime culture from which we all descend.

Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Harvard University