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Team goal orientation composition, team efficacy, and team performance: The separate roles of team leader and members

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 January 2017

Chiung-Yi Huang
Affiliation:
Yuan Ze University, College Of Management, Discipline Of Organization Management, 135 Yuan-Tung Road, Chung-Li Dist, Taoyuan City 32003, Taiwan (R.O.C.)
Jia-Chi Huang
Affiliation:
National Chengchi University, Department Of Business Administration, No. 64, Sec. 2, Zhi-Nan Road, Wenshan Dist, Taipei City 11605, Taiwan (R.O.C)
Yuhsuan Chang
Affiliation:
Yuan Ze University, College Of Management, Discipline Of Organization Management, 135 Yuan-Tung Road, Chung-Li Dist, Taoyuan City 32003, Taiwan (R.O.C.)
Corresponding

Abstract

This study aims to examine team goal orientation composition regarding the different roles of a leader’s and team members’ collective goal orientation, and the effects of these on team outcomes. Data included 268 respondents from 64 teams. Results showed team members’ learning goal orientation has positive effect on team performance, mediated by team efficacy. Further, for the role of team leader, the results also revealed the same pattern. Study also showed a leader’s performance goal orientation has negatively related on team performance, mediated by team efficacy. Finally, taking both roles simultaneously, study indicated the interaction between a leader’s and members’ performance goal orientation has negatively related to team efficacy, and the interaction between a leader’s and members’ learning goal orientation has negatively related to team performance. This research contributes to the existing goal orientation theory by taking the different roles of team leader and members into consideration.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management 2017 

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