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Association of meal timing of energy, macronutrients and foods with hypercholesterolaemia in the US adults

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2023

Xiangning Li
Affiliation:
National Key Discipline, Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, People’s Republic of China
Tianshu Han
Affiliation:
National Key Discipline, Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, People’s Republic of China
Xinyi Sun
Affiliation:
National Key Discipline, Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, People’s Republic of China
Yunyan Chen
Affiliation:
National Key Discipline, Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, People’s Republic of China
Jiaxu Xu
Affiliation:
National Key Discipline, Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, People’s Republic of China
Yifan Ma
Affiliation:
National Key Discipline, Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, People’s Republic of China
Wanying Hou*
Affiliation:
National Key Discipline, Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, People’s Republic of China
Changhao Sun*
Affiliation:
National Key Discipline, Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, People’s Republic of China
*
* Corresponding authors: Dr W. Hou, email wanying0812@163.com; Dr C. Sun, email changhaosun2002@163.com
* Corresponding authors: Dr W. Hou, email wanying0812@163.com; Dr C. Sun, email changhaosun2002@163.com

Abstract

Few studies examined the association of energy, macronutrients and food consumption at dinner v. breakfast with hypercholesterolaemia. A total of 27 911 participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003–2016) were included in the cross-sectional study. Energy, macronutrients and food consumption at breakfast, dinner and the difference at dinner v. breakfast (Δratio) were calculated. Multiple logistic regression models and substitution effects of foods at dinner with breakfast were also performed. After adjustment for potential covariates, compared with the lowest quintile, participants in the highest quintile of Δratio in terms of energy had a higher risk of prevalent hypercholesterolaemia (ORΔratio of energy 1·16, 95 % CI (1·01, 1·33)) mainly due to Δratio of low-quality carbohydrates and plant protein (ORΔratio of low-quality carbohydrates 1·19; 95 % CI (1·05, 1·35)); ORΔratio of plant protein 1·13; 95 % CI (1·01, 1·28)). ΔAdded sugars and Δnuts were associated with hypercholesterolaemia (ORΔadded sugars 1·01; 95 % CI (1·00, 1·02)); ORΔnuts 1·08; 95 % CI (1·01, 1·16)). Furthermore, the substitution of added sugars, nuts and processed meat at dinner with breakfast could reduce the OR of hypercholesterolaemia. This study indicated that among US adults, overconsumption of energy, macronutrients including low-quality carbohydrates and plant protein at dinner than breakfast was significantly associated with a higher risk of prevalent hypercholesterolaemia. The replacing of added sugar, nuts and processed meat at dinner with breakfast reduced the risk of prevalent hypercholesterolaemia. This study emphasised the importance of meal timing in the prevention of hypercholesterolaemia.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, 2023. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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