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Response of Various Weed Species and Corn (Zea mays) to RPA 201772

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Prasanta C. Bhowmik
Affiliation:
Weed Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003
Sanjay Kushwaha
Affiliation:
Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003
Sowmya Mitra
Affiliation:
Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Greenhouse and field experiments were conducted to determine the response of corn (Zea mays), barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli), common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album), large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis), velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti), and yellow foxtail (Setaria lutescence) to RPA 201772. Barnyardgrass, large crabgrass, velvetleaf, and common lambsquarters were more susceptible than yellow foxtail to RPA 201772. Velvetleaf was the most susceptible species and rates above 18 g ai/ha of RPA 201772 controlled 100% of the population 4 wk after treatment (WAT). Percent control of all the weed species increased with increased RPA 201772 rates. In the field, the dry weights of yellow foxtail decreased as the rate of RPA 201772 increased from 0 to 210 g/ha. However, a 60% reduction of dry weight of yellow foxtail was recorded at 140 g/ha of RPA 201772 compared to the untreated check 6 WAT, whereas at 12 WAT the dry weight of yellow foxtail was reduced to only 15% because of intraspecific competition. Yellow foxtail was moderately susceptible to RPA 201772. Corn was tolerant to RPA 201772; the GR80 value was 435 g/ha in the greenhouse. The bleaching injury to corn in the field was less than 10%, and it was found only with the 210 g/ha rate of RPA 201772. This injury was temporary and the plants recovered within 2 to 3 wk. Based on the GR80 values, velvetleaf was the most susceptible, followed by common lambsquarters, large crabgrass, barnyardgrass, and yellow foxtail.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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Footnotes

1

A contribution from Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station; Journal Article No. 3239.

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