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Imaging faint companions very close to stars

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2011

Eugene Serabyn
Affiliation:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA email: gene.serabyn@jpl.nasa.gov
Dimitri Mawet
Affiliation:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA email: gene.serabyn@jpl.nasa.gov
Rick Burruss
Affiliation:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA email: gene.serabyn@jpl.nasa.gov
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Abstract

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A vortex coronagraph on our extreme adaptive optics “well-corrected subaperture” on the Hale telescope has recently allowed the imaging of the triple-planet HR8799 system with a 1.5 m subaperture. Moreover, a faint, low-mass companion to a second star was imaged only one diffraction beam width away from the primary. These results illustrate the potential of the vortex coronagraph, which can enable exoplanet imaging and characterization with smaller telescopes than previously thought.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2011

References

Burruss, R. S., Serabyn, E., Mawet, D. P., Roberts, J. E., Hickey, J. P., Rykoski, K., Bikkannavar, S., & Crepp, J. R. 2003, Proc. SPIE, 7736, 77365XCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guyon, O., Pluzhnik, E. A., Kuchner, M. J., Collins, B., & Ridgway, S. T. 2006, ApJS, 167, 81CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mawet, D., Serabyn, E., Liewer, K., Burruss, R., Hickey, J., & Shemo, D. 2010, ApJ 709, 53CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Serabyn, E., Mawet, D., & Burruss, R. 2010, Nature, 464, 1018CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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