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Thin Film Nanoelectronic Probe for Protein Detection

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2013

Rahim Esfandyarpour*
Affiliation:
Center for Integrated Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University
Mehdi Javanmard
Affiliation:
Stanford Genome Technology Center; 855 California Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
Zahra Koochak
Affiliation:
University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064, USA
Hesaam Esfandyarpour
Affiliation:
Center for Integrated Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University
James S. Harris
Affiliation:
Center for Integrated Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University
Ronald W. Davis
Affiliation:
Stanford Genome Technology Center; 855 California Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
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Abstract

There are many biological macro-molecules such as nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates and proteins. While each of them plays a vital (and interesting) part in life but there is something special about the proteins. Proteins are the key link between the processes of information and replication that take place on a genetic level and the infrastructure of living features. Understanding the properties of proteins is the key to understanding the spark of the life. In this paper we describe our study of various electrical properties of protein when performing measurements at the nanoscale. To achieve this goal we designed and fabricated a nanoelectronic probe. This nano structure consists of four thin film layers. There are two conductive layers and an insulative layer in between. There is also a protective oxide layer as the top most layer. This layer is to prevent the exposure of conductive electrodes to the solution. Underneath the bottom electrode, there is another oxide layer, which can be a thermally grown oxide. This layer insulates the first electrode from the substrate. In this study, while we use non-specific detection of streptavidin protein as a proof of concept, we emphasize that the findings of this study can be extended to specific detection of target proteins, where in this case a specific probe molecule would also be immobilized on the sensor surface.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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References

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