Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-j4m62 Total loading time: 0.181 Render date: 2021-05-09T00:42:11.206Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Radiation Growth of HCP Metals under Cascade Damage Conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 February 2012

Stanislav I. Golubov
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831- 6138, USA Center for Materials Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, East Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750, USA
Alexander V. Barashev
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831- 6138, USA Center for Materials Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, East Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750, USA
Roger E. Stoller
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831- 6138, USA
Get access

Abstract

Models of radiation growth proposed to date are all based on the assumption that the primary damage is produced by neutron irradiation in the form of single defects. These models do not account for the features of the cascade damage: intra-cascade clustering of self‑interstitial atoms (SIAs) and their one‑dimensional diffusion. During the last twenty years, a ‘Production Bias Model’ has been developed, which shows that the damage accumulation in cubic metals depends crucially on the cascade properties. The cascades in hcp zirconium are similar to those in cubic crystals; hence the model can provide a realistic framework for the hcp metals as well. In this work we present such a model in application to low-temperature (below 300°C) radiation growth.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Buckley, S.N., Properties of Reactor Materials and Effects of Radiation Damage, ed. Littler, W.J. (Butterworths, London, 1962) p. 413.Google Scholar
2. Holt, R.A., J. Nucl. Mater. 372, 182 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Wooding, S.J., Howe, L.M., Gao, F., Calder, A.F., and Bacon, D.J., J. Nucl. Mater. 254, 191 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. De Diego, N., Osetsky, Y.N., and Bacon, D.J., In: Proceedings of MRS Fall Meeting; Boston, MA; USA; (2000) p. 200.Google Scholar
5. Holt, R.A., Woo, C.H., and Chow, C.K., J. Nucl. Mater. 205, 293 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Golubov, S.I., Singh, B.N., and Trinkaus, H., Phil. Mag. A81, 2533 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Walters, G.P., J. Nucl. Mater. 136, 263 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Wolfer, W.G., Computer-Aided Mater. Des. 14, 403 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Barashev, A.V., and Golubov, S.I., Phil. Mag. 89, 2833 (2009).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Singh, B.N., Golubov, S.I., Trinkaus, H., Serra, A., Osetsky, Yu.N., and Barashev, A.V., J. Nucl. Mater. 251, 107 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Golubov, S.I., Barashev, A.V., and Stoller, R.E.. “Mean Field Reaction Rate Theory”, In: Encyclopedia of Comprehensive Nuclear Materials, Chapter 1.13, edited by Konings, Rudy, Elsevier Ltd. (2012).Google Scholar
12. de Carlan, Y., Regnard, C., Griffiths, M., Gilbon, D., and Lemaignan, C., ASTM STP 1295, 638 (1996).Google Scholar
13. Griffiths, M., Holt, R.A., and Rogerson, A., J. Nucl. Mater. 225, 245 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Golubov, S.I., Barashev, A.V., and Stoller, R.E., ORNL Report ORNL/TM-2011/473 (2011), available online via http://www.osti.gov/bridge.Google Scholar
15. Holt, R.A., and Gilbert, R.W., J. Nucl. Mater. 116, 127 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Griffiths, M., J. Nucl. Mater. 159, 190 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Risbet, R., and Levy, V., J. Nucl. Mater. 50, 116 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Barashev, A.V., and Golubov, S.I., Phil. Mag. 90, 1787 (2010).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Radiation Growth of HCP Metals under Cascade Damage Conditions
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Radiation Growth of HCP Metals under Cascade Damage Conditions
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Radiation Growth of HCP Metals under Cascade Damage Conditions
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *