Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-rxvp8 Total loading time: 0.152 Render date: 2021-06-15T08:26:19.137Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Evolution of Surface Morphology During Cu(TMVS)(hfac) Sourced Copper CVD

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Daewon Yang
Affiliation:
Focus Center – New York, Rensselaer: Interconnections for Gigascale Integration, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180
Jongwon Hong
Affiliation:
Focus Center – New York, Rensselaer: Interconnections for Gigascale Integration, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180
Timothy S. Cale
Affiliation:
Focus Center – New York, Rensselaer: Interconnections for Gigascale Integration, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180
Get access

Abstract

In this paper, we describe an experimental study of the nucleation and growth stages during Cu(TMVS)(hfac) sourced Cu CVD on TaN substrates. In particular, we have investigated the effects of water vapor as a co-reactant on evolving surface morphology. The results of short (less than 10 s) depositions without/with water vapor indicate that water vapor helps to reduce the incubation time and to enhance the nuclei formation, uniformity, and adhesion (based on AFM analysis). Introducing water vapor during only the initial stage of deposition results in lower roughnesses, larger grain sizes, and lower short-range roughnesses as compared to the films deposited without water vapor. From this study, we conclude that water vapor enhances Cu nucleation and that a relatively small amount of water vapor before or during the initial stage of deposition improves surface morphology in terms of roughness and grain size.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, 1999 edition, (http://www.itrs.net/1999_SIA_Roadmap/Home.htm).Google Scholar
2. Singh, R. and Ulrich, R. K., INTERFACE 8(2), 26 (1999).Google Scholar
3. Jain, A., Chi, K.-M., Kodas, T. T. and Hampden-Smith, M. J., J. Electrochem. Soc. 140, 1434 (1993).10.1149/1.2221574CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Jain, A., Gelatos, A. V., Kodas, T. T., Hampden-Smith, M. J., Marsh, R. and Mogab, C. J., Thin Solid Films 262, 52 (1995).10.1016/0040-6090(94)05809-1CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Mermet, J.-L., Mouche, M.-J., Pires, F., Richard, E., Torres, J., Palleau, J. and Braud, F., Journal De Physique IV 5, C5517 (1995).10.1051/jphyscol:1995560CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Naik, M. B., S, Lakshmanan, K., Wentorf, R. H., Reeves, R. R. and Gill, W. N., J. Cryst. Growth 19, 133 (1998).10.1016/S0022-0248(98)00452-7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Kim, J.-Y., Lee, Y.-K., Park, H.-S., Park, J.-W., Park, D.-K., Joo, J.-H., Lee, W.-H., Ko, Y.-K., Reucroft, P. J. and Cho, B.-R., Thin Solid films 330, 190 (1998).10.1016/S0040-6090(98)00597-5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Kim, S., Park, J.-M. and Choi, D.-J., Thin Solid Films 315, 229 (1998).10.1016/S0040-6090(97)00684-6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Website of ThermoMicroscopes (at http://www.park.com/products).Google Scholar
12. Lu, T.-M., Yang, H.-N. and Wang, G.-C., Fractal Aspects of Materials (Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 367, Pittsburgh, PA 1995) pp. 283292.Google Scholar
13. Farkas, J., Hampden-Smith, M. J. and Kodas, T. T., J. Electrochem. Soc. 141, 3539 (1994).10.1149/1.2059367CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Jain, A., Kodas, T. T., Corbitt, T. S. and Hampden-Smith, M. J., Chem. Mater. 8, 1119 (1996).10.1021/cm950546yCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Evolution of Surface Morphology During Cu(TMVS)(hfac) Sourced Copper CVD
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Evolution of Surface Morphology During Cu(TMVS)(hfac) Sourced Copper CVD
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Evolution of Surface Morphology During Cu(TMVS)(hfac) Sourced Copper CVD
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *