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An Overview of the H12 Performance Assessment in Perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Kaname Miyahara
Affiliation:
Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (at present
Hitoshi Makino
Affiliation:
Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (at present
Tomoko Kato
Affiliation:
Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (at present
Keiichiro Wakasugi
Affiliation:
Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (at present
Atsushi Sawada
Affiliation:
Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (at present
Yuji Ijiri
Affiliation:
Taisei Corporation Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute
Aki Takasu
Affiliation:
Nuclear Safety Research Association Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute
Morimasa Naito
Affiliation:
Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan) Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute
Hiroyuki Umeki
Affiliation:
Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan) Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute
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Abstract

The H12 performance assessment (PA) provided a test for the robustness of a HLW repository system concept based on structured siting and design, taking account of a wide range of potentially suitable Japanese geological environments. The generic nature of the host rock in the H12 assessment means, however, that emphasis is placed verymuch on strong EBS performance. The assessment included a comprehensive evaluation of uncertainty and potentially detrimental factors, including perturbations due to external events and processes. Despite the considerable uncertainty at the current stage of the Japanese program, a safety case that is adequate for the aims of the assessment can be made by a strategy of employing conservatism where there is uncertainty and stressing the reliability and effectiveness of the performance of the near-field. The aim of this paper is to present the H12 PA in a way which makes the PA process clearer and the implications of the results more meaningful, both to workers within the PA field and to a wider technical audience.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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