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LOVE, MONEY, LOCATION: THE INTERCONNECTEDNESS OF MARITAL STATUS, INCOME, AND LOCATION CHOICE OF IMMIGRANTS TO BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 November 2017

Marcel Voia*
Affiliation:
University of Carleton
Wen Ci
Affiliation:
Statistics Canada
Michael Haan
Affiliation:
University of Western Ontario
*
Address correspondence to: Marcel Voia, University of Carleton, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; e-mail: marcel.voia@carleton.ca.
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Abstract

The objectives of this study are twofold: first, we assess what factors “anchors” are keeping immigrants in their current place of residence, and what variables drive immigrants to move out of their community. Second, we also look at how the effects of these factors on migration differ by whether or not immigrants are living in ethnic enclaves and by the macro-level economic environment. We find that the conventional “anchors” of mobility are less powerful for immigrants living in co-ethnic regions. Results also show that under depressed economic conditions, migration decisions are largely driven by economic factors, and that socio-demographic factors like marital status are less consequential. Conversely, when general economic conditions are better for immigrants, marital status will weigh more heavily on migration decisions.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Université catholique de Louvain 2017 

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References

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LOVE, MONEY, LOCATION: THE INTERCONNECTEDNESS OF MARITAL STATUS, INCOME, AND LOCATION CHOICE OF IMMIGRANTS TO BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA
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