Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-4xs5l Total loading time: 0.175 Render date: 2021-06-18T05:25:45.282Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

3520 Neural connectivity mechanisms linking off-time pubertal development and depression risk in adolescence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 March 2019

Rajpreet Chahal
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Scott Marek
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Veronika Vilgis
Affiliation:
Harvard University
David Weissman
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Paul Hastings
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Richard Robins
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Amanda E. Guyer
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: Earlier pubertal timing has been associated with risk for depression, particularly in girls (e.g., Keenan etal., 2014). Evidence suggests pubertal timing in girls also relates to alterations in the microstructural properties of brain white matter tracts in late adolescence (Chahal etal., 2018), and structural connectivity of cingulate and frontal regions (Chahal etal., in prep), though differences in pubertal development in both boys and girls have not been examined in the context of brain functional connectivity (FC). Individual differences in the course of puberty may have enduring effects on functional coupling among brain regions that may contribute to the risk for psychopathology. To address this question, we explored the relation between pubertal timing and tempo with depression symptoms (age 16). Then, we examined whether brain network FC (age 16) associates with pubertal indices and predicts concurrent and later depressive symptoms (age 18). METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Sixty-eight adolescents (37 females) completed the Mini-Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ; Clark & Watson, 1995) at ages 14-18. Gompertz growth curve modelling of pubertal development (age 10-15; Waves 1-6) was used to estimate pubertal timing and tempo per individual, separately for males and females (e.g., Chahal etal., 2018). Resting-state MRI data (age 16) were parcellated into 264 cortical and subcortical regions to create region-to-region FC matrices based on correlations of time-series. Individual matrices were fed to the GraphVar program (Kruschwitz etal., 2015) to assess the interaction of pubertal timing and pubertal tempo with functional network connectivity using Network-based statistic (NBS; Zalesky etal., 2010). Subnetworks showing alterations in relation to pubertal timing and tempo were then examined in association with concurrent (age 16) symptoms and used to predict future depressive symptoms (age 18). RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: In all youth, earlier pubertal timing was associated with higher depressive symptoms at age 16 (p<.018). This association was stronger in girls with slower pubertal tempo (p<.039). Interregional connectivity analyses revealed that the interaction of earlier pubertal timing and slower tempo was associated with lower FC between the left cingulate gyrus and right precuneus (p<.0001), regions implicated in emotion processing (i.e., Affective Processing Network) and self-referential thinking (i.e., Default Mode Network). FC of the three other emotion- and self-referential processing network regions (i.g., left insula, superior parietal lobule, and precuneus) was lower in youth with greater age 16 depressive symptoms (p<.0001). Finally, lower FC of of the left and right inferior parietal lobule predicted greater depressive symptoms at age 18 (p<.0001). In summary, FC of overlapping affective and default mode network areas was related to earlier pubertal timing and higher concurrent and future depressive symptoms. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: These findings demonstrate individual differences in pubertal maturation are associated with depressive symptoms and differences in brain connectivity in mid-adolescence. Early pubertal development was associated with greater depression symptoms and lower FC of brain regions involved in emotion regulation and self-referential processing. Further, FC between these regions predicted higher depression symptoms two years later. These neurobiological mechanisms may, in part, underlie the link between off-time pubertal development and the risk for depression. These findings also have important implications for precision psychiatry, as we show that a risk-factor of depression (early pubertal timing) may manifest in developing neurobiology in region-specific ways. Previous network models of depression (e.g., Li etal., 2018) implicated affective network connectivity in sustained negative mood and the default mode/ self-referential network in rumination. Other networks implicated in these past models include the reward network, which may be involved in anhedonia and loss of pleasure. Our study only found associations between affective and self-referential regional connectivity, pubertal maturation, and depression, suggesting that pubertal risk factors may relate more closely with emotion-regulation and self-referential processing deficits.

Type
Basic/Translational Science/Team Science
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2019
You have Access
Open access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

3520 Neural connectivity mechanisms linking off-time pubertal development and depression risk in adolescence
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

3520 Neural connectivity mechanisms linking off-time pubertal development and depression risk in adolescence
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

3520 Neural connectivity mechanisms linking off-time pubertal development and depression risk in adolescence
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *