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Device-Associated Infection Rates in 20 Cities of India, Data Summary for 2004–2013: Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 November 2015

Yatin Mehta
Affiliation:
Medanta the Medicity, New Delhi, India
Namita Jaggi
Affiliation:
Artemis Health Institute, New Delhi, India
Victor Daniel Rosenthal
Affiliation:
International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Maithili Kavathekar
Affiliation:
Sahyadri Speciality Hospital, Pune, India
Asmita Sakle
Affiliation:
Bombay Hospital, Mumbai, India
Nita Munshi
Affiliation:
Ruby Hall Clinic, Pune, India
Murali Chakravarthy
Affiliation:
Fortis Hospitals, Bangalore, India
Subhash Kumar Todi
Affiliation:
Advanced Medicare Research Institute Hospitals, Kolkata, India
Narinder Saini
Affiliation:
Pushpanjali Crosslay Hospital, Ghaziabad, India
Camilla Rodrigues
Affiliation:
PD Hinduja National Hospital & Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, India
Karthikeya Varma
Affiliation:
Malabar Institute of Medical Sciences, Calicut, India
Rekha Dubey
Affiliation:
Aditya Birla Memorial Hospital, Pune, India
Mohammad Mukhit Kazi
Affiliation:
Noble Hospital, Pune, India
F. E. Udwadia
Affiliation:
Breach Candy Hospital Trust, Mumbai, India
Sheila Nainan Myatra
Affiliation:
Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India
Sweta Shah
Affiliation:
Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, Mumbai, India
Arpita Dwivedy
Affiliation:
Dr. L. H. Hiranandani Hospital, Mumbai, India
Anil Karlekar
Affiliation:
Escorts Heart Institute & Research Centre, New Delhi, India
Sanjeev Singh
Affiliation:
Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences & Research Center, Kochi, India
Nagamani Sen
Affiliation:
Christian Medical College, Vellore, India
Kashmira Limaye-Joshi
Affiliation:
Jupiter Hospital, Thane, India
Bala Ramachandran
Affiliation:
Kanchi Kamakoti Childs Trust Hospital, Chennai, India
Suneeta Sahu
Affiliation:
Apollo Hospitals, Bhubaneswar, India
Nirav Pandya
Affiliation:
Bhailal Amin General Hospital, Vadodara, India
Purva Mathur
Affiliation:
JPNA Trauma Centre- All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
Samir Sahu
Affiliation:
Kalinga Hospital, Bhubaneswar, India
Suman P. Singh
Affiliation:
Shree Krishna Hospital, Karamsad, India
Anil Kumar Bilolikar
Affiliation:
Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Secundebarad, India
Siva Kumar
Affiliation:
Kovai Medical Center and Hospital, Coimbatore, India
Preeti Mehta
Affiliation:
Seth GS Medical College, Mumbai, India
Vikram Padbidri
Affiliation:
Jehangir Hospital, Pune, India
N. Gita
Affiliation:
Rao Nursing Home, Pune, India
Saroj K. Patnaik
Affiliation:
Command Hospital Air Force, Bangalore, India
Thara Francis
Affiliation:
Frontier Lifeline Hospital, Chennai, India
Anup R. Warrier
Affiliation:
Kerala Institute of Medical Sciences, Trivandrum, India
S. Muralidharan
Affiliation:
G Kuppuswami Naidu Memorial Hospital, Coimbatore, India
Pravin Kumar Nair
Affiliation:
Holy Spirit Hospital, Mumbai, India
Vaibhavi R. Subhedar
Affiliation:
Bombay Hospital, Indore, India
Ramachadran Gopinath
Affiliation:
Nizam’s Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, India
Afzal Azim
Affiliation:
Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India
Sanjeev Sood
Affiliation:
Military Hospital, Jodhpur, India.
Corresponding

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium surveillance data from 40 hospitals (20 cities) in India 2004–2013.

METHODS

Surveillance using US National Healthcare Safety Network’s criteria and definitions, and International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium methodology.

RESULTS

We collected data from 236,700 ICU patients for 970,713 bed-days

Pooled device-associated healthcare-associated infection rates for adult and pediatric ICUs were 5.1 central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs)/1,000 central line–days, 9.4 cases of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAPs)/1,000 mechanical ventilator–days, and 2.1 catheter-associated urinary tract infections/1,000 urinary catheter–days

In neonatal ICUs (NICUs) pooled rates were 36.2 CLABSIs/1,000 central line–days and 1.9 VAPs/1,000 mechanical ventilator–days

Extra length of stay in adult and pediatric ICUs was 9.5 for CLABSI, 9.1 for VAP, and 10.0 for catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Extra length of stay in NICUs was 14.7 for CLABSI and 38.7 for VAP

Crude extra mortality was 16.3% for CLABSI, 22.7% for VAP, and 6.6% for catheter-associated urinary tract infections in adult and pediatric ICUs, and 1.2% for CLABSI and 8.3% for VAP in NICUs

Pooled device use ratios were 0.21 for mechanical ventilator, 0.39 for central line, and 0.53 for urinary catheter in adult and pediatric ICUs; and 0.07 for mechanical ventilator and 0.06 for central line in NICUs.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite a lower device use ratio in our ICUs, our device-associated healthcare-associated infection rates are higher than National Healthcare Safety Network, but lower than International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium Report.

Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(2):172–181

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 2015 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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Footnotes

Additional authors are listed at the end of the text.

References

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