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A survey of emergency medicine in 36 countries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 May 2015

Jeffrey L. Arnold*
Affiliation:
Ruth and Harry Roman Department of Emergency Medicine, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif.
Garth Dickinson
Affiliation:
Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont.
Ming-Che Tsai
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC
David Han
Affiliation:
Ruth and Harry Roman Department of Emergency Medicine, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif.
*
The Ruth and Harry Roman Department of Emergency Medicine, Burns and Allen Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles CA 90048; fax 310 659-8061, arnoldmd@aol.com

Abstract

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Objective:

To assess the current level of development of emergency medicine (EM) systems in the world.

Design:

Survey of EM professionals from 36 countries during a 90-day period from Aug. 25 to Nov. 24, 1998.

Participants:

Thirty-six EM professionals from 36 countries and 6 continents completed the survey. Thirty-five (97%) were physicians, of whom 25 (69%) gave presentations at 1 of 4 international EM conferences during the study period. Three potential participants from 3 countries were excluded because of language barriers. Five additional participants from 5 other countries did not respond within the study period and were excluded.

Measurements:

Respondents completed a 103-question questionnaire about the presence of EM specialty, academic, patient care, information and management systems and the factors influencing the future of EM in their countries.

Results:

The overall response rate was 88%. Nearly all respondents (97%) stated that their countries had hospital-based emergency departments (EDs). More than 80% of respondents reported that their countries have emergency medical services (EMS), national EMS activation phone numbers and ED systems for pediatric emergency care. More than 70% stated that their countries had national EM organizations, EM research, ED systems for patient transfer and peer review and emergency physician (EP) training in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and the ability to perform rapid sequence intubation. More than 60% reported ED systems for trauma care and triage and EP training in Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) and the ability to perform thrombolysis for acute myocardial infarction. Fifty percent reported EM residency training programs, official recognition of EM as an independent specialty, and EM journals.

Conclusions:

Basic emergency medicine components now exist in the majority of countries surveyed. These include many specialty, academic, patient care and administrative systems. The foundation for further EM development is widely established throughout the world.

Type
International EM • MU Internationale
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2001

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