Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-8r4lv Total loading time: 0.211 Render date: 2021-07-26T14:57:20.898Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The impact of including babies on the effectiveness of dialectical behaviour therapy skills groups in a community perinatal service

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2020

Adele E. Greaves
Affiliation:
Sussex and East Surrey Specialist Perinatal Mental Health Service, Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, UK
Hannah McKenzie
Affiliation:
Sussex and East Surrey Specialist Perinatal Mental Health Service, Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, UK
Rachel O’Brien
Affiliation:
Sussex and East Surrey Specialist Perinatal Mental Health Service, Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, UK
Anna Roberts
Affiliation:
Sussex and East Surrey Specialist Perinatal Mental Health Service, Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, UK
Kate Alexander
Affiliation:
Sussex and East Surrey Specialist Perinatal Mental Health Service, Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, UK
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background:

Perinatal mental illnesses are a major public health issue, which untreated can have devastating impacts on women and their families. Problems with emotion regulation are a common feature across perinatal mental illnesses.

Aims:

This study sought to evaluate the impacts of dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) skills groups for mothers and babies in a community perinatal service. We hypothesised that community perinatal DBT skills groups that included babies would reduce distress and improve emotional regulation.

Method:

A mixed-methods within-subjects design was utilised with outcome measures collected pre- and post-intervention. Qualitative interviews exploring mothers’ experiences of bringing their baby to group were also conducted.

Results:

Results indicated that DBT skills groups significantly improved levels of psychological distress and emotional regulation.

Conclusions:

Community perinatal DBT skills groups are effective when babies are present. Moreover, benefits of including babies were identified, under the themes of Self as Mother, Shared Experience, and Impact of Babies.

Type
Main
Copyright
© British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bauer, A., Parsonage, M., Knapp, M., Iemmi, V., & Adelaja, B. (2014). Costs of Perinatal Mental Health Problems. London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK.Google Scholar
Blackford, J. P., & Love, R. (2012). Dialectical behaviour therapy group skills training in a community mental health setting: a pilot study. International Journal Group Psychotherapy, 61, 645657.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2006). Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3, 77101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Christie, J. & Bunting, B. (2011). The effect of health visitors’ postpartum home visit frequency on first-time mothers: cluster randomised trial. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 48, 689702.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Evans, C., Mellor-Clark, J., Margison, F., Barkham, M., Audin, K. Connell, J., & McGrath, G. (2000). CORE: Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation. Journal of Mental Health, 9, 247255. doi: 10.1080/jmh.9.3.247.255 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, C., Connell, J., Barkham, M., Margison, F., McGrath, G., Mellor-Clark, J., & Audin, K. (2002). Towards a standardised brief outcome measure: psychometric properties and utility of the CORE-OM. British Journal of Psychiatry, 18, 5160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fraiberg, S., Adelson, E., & Shapiro, V. (1975). Ghosts in the nursery: a psychoanalytic approach to the problems of impaired infant–mother relationships. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 14, 387421. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-7138(09)61442-4 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hewitt, J. (2007). Ethical components of researcher–researched relationships in qualitative interviewing. Qualitative Health Research, 17, 11491159. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732307308305 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jones, A. (2007). Parent–infant psychotherapy: when feelings of futility are prevalent. In Pozzi-Monzo, M. and Tydeman, B. (eds), Innovations in Parent–Infant Psychotherapy. Karnac, UK.Google Scholar
Katz, K. S., Blake, S. M., Milligan, R. A., Sharps, P. W., White, D. B., Rodan, M. F., Rossi, M., & Murray, K. B. (2008). The design, implementation and acceptability of an integrated intervention to address multiple behavioral and psychosocial risk factors among pregnant African American women. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 25, 22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kleiber, B. V., Felder, J. N., Ashby, B., Scott, S., Dean, J., & Dimidjian, S. (2017). Treating depression among adolescent perinatal women with a dialectical behaviour therapy-informed skills group. Cognitive and Behavioural Practise, 24, 416427. doi: 10.1016/j.cbpra.2016.12.002 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knight, M., Tuffnell, M., Kenyon, S., Shakespeare, J., Gray, R. & Kurinczuk, J. J. (eds) on behalf of MBRRACE-UK (2015). Saving lives, improving mothers’ care surveillance of maternal deaths in the UK 2011–13 and lessons learned to inform maternity care from the UK and Ireland Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths and Morbidity 2009–13. Oxford, UK: National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford.Google Scholar
Lieberman, A. F., & Van Horn, P. (2008). Psychotherapy with Infants and Young Children New York, USA: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Linehan, M. (2015). DBT Skills Training Manual (2nd edn). New York, USA: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Maliken, A. C., & Katz, L. F. (2013). Exploring the impact of parent psychopathology and emotion regulation on evidenced based parenting interventions: a transdiagnostic approach to improving treatment effectiveness. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 16, 173186 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martin, C. G., Roos, L. E., Zalewski, M., & Cummins, N. (2017). A dialectical behaviour therapy skills group case study on mothers with severe emotion dysregulation. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 24, 405415. doi: 10.1016/j.cbpra.2016.08.002 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meyer, S., Raikes, H. A., Virmani, E. A., Waters, S., & Thompson, R. A. (2014). Parent emotion representations and the socialization of emotion regulation in the family. International Journal of Behavioural Development, 38, 164172. Doi: 10.1177/0165025413519014 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Millett, L., Lever Taylor, B. L., Howard, L. M., Bick, D., Stanley, N., & Johnson, S. (2017). Experiences of improving access to psychological therapy services for perinatal mental health difficulties: a qualitative study of women’s and therapists’ views. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 46, 421436. doi: 10.1017/S1352465817000650 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Miller, A. L., Rathus, J. H., & Linehan, M. M. (2006). Dielctical Behavior Therapy with Suicidal Adolescents. New York, USA: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Morris, A. S, Silk, J. S., Steinberg, L., Myers, S. S., & Robinson, L. R. (2007). The role of the family context in the development of emotion regulation. Social Development, 16, 361388.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murray, L., & Andrews, L. (2000). The Social Baby: Understanding Babies’ Communication from Birth. Richmond: CP Publishing.Google Scholar
National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (2020). NICE Clinical Guideline, CG 192. Antenatal and postnatal mental health: clinical management and service guidance. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg192 Google Scholar
Neacsiu, A. D., Eberle, J. W., Kramer, R., Wiesmann, T., & Linehan, M. M. (2014). Dialectical behaviour therapy skills for transdiagnostic emotion dysregulation: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 59, 4051. doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2014.05.005 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nix, R. L., Bierman, K. L., & McMahon, R. J. (2009). How attendance and quality of participation affect treatment response to parent management training. Journal of consulting and Clinical Psychology, 77, 429438. doi: 10.1037/a0015028 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Noble, H., & Smith, J. (2015). Issues of validity and reliability in qualitative research. Evidence Based Nursing, 18, 3435.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
O’Mahen, H., Fedock, G., Henshaw, E., Himle, J. A., Forman, J., & Flynn, H. A. (2012). Modifying CBT for perinatal depression: what do women want? A qualitative study. Cognitive and Behavioural Practice, 19, 359371. doi: 10.1016/j.cbpra.2011.05.005 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Paul, C., & Thomson-Salo, F. (2007). Babies in groups: the creative roles of the babies, the mothers and the therapists. In Pozzi-Monzo, M. E. (ed), Innovations in Parent–Infant Psychotherapy. Karnac, London.Google Scholar
Robson, C. (2017). Small-Scale Evaluation: Principles and Practice. Sage Publications.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rutherford, H. J. V., Wallace, N. S., Laurent, H. K., & Mayes, L. C. (2015). Emotion regulation in parenthood. Development Review, 36, 114. doi: 10.1016/j.dr.2014.12.008 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sambrook, S., Abba, N. & Chadwick, P. (2006). Evaluation of DBT emotional coping skills groups for people with parasuicidal behaviours. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 35, 241244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Soler, J., Pascal, J., Tiana, T., Cebrai, A., Barachina, J., Campins, M. et al. (2009). Dialectical behaviour therapy skills training compared to standard group therapy in borderline personality disorder: a 3 month randomised control trial. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 47, 353358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stein, A., Netsi, E., Lawrence, P.J., Granger, C., Kempton, C., Craske, M.G., Nickless, A., Mollison, J., Stewart, A., Rapa, E., West, V., Scerif, G., Cooper, P. J., & Murray, L. (2018). Mitigating the effect of persistent postnatal depression on child outcomes through an intervention to treat depression and improve parenting: a randomised controlled trial. The Lancet Psychiatry, 5, 134144.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stern, D. (1998). The Motherhood Constellation: A Unified View of ParentInfant Psychotherapy. Karnac Books, London.Google Scholar
Ugarriza, D. N. (2004). Group therapy and its barriers for women suffering from postpartum depression Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 18, 3948 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van den Boom, D. C. (1994). The influence of temperament on mothering on attachment and exploration: an experimental manipulation of sensitive responsiveness among lower-class mothers with irritable infants. Child Development, 65, 14571477.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Victor, S. E., & Klonsky, E. D. (2016). Validation of a brief version of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS-18) in five samples. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioural Assessment, 38, 582589.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilson, H., & Donachie, A. L. (2018). Evaluating the effectiveness of a dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) informed programme in a community perinatal team Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 46, 541553. doi: 10.1017/S1352465817000790 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zalewski, M., Stepp, S. D., Whalen, D. J., & Scott, L. N. (2015). A qualitative assessment of the parenting challenges and treatment needs of mothers with borderline personality disorder. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 25, 7189.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The impact of including babies on the effectiveness of dialectical behaviour therapy skills groups in a community perinatal service
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The impact of including babies on the effectiveness of dialectical behaviour therapy skills groups in a community perinatal service
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The impact of including babies on the effectiveness of dialectical behaviour therapy skills groups in a community perinatal service
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *