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46 - Post-hospital nutrition of the preterm infant

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 December 2009

Patti J. Thureen
Affiliation:
University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
Diane M. Anderson
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
Richard J. Schanler
Affiliation:
Schneider Children’s Hospital at North Shore, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
William W. Hay
Affiliation:
University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
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Summary

Post-hospital nutrition of the preterm infant

Precise nutrient requirements and achievable growth remain to be defined for the premature infant post-hospital discharge. While fetal growth serves as the standard for the infant less than 37 weeks gestation and breastfeeding meets the needs of the healthy term infant, neither goal meets the needs of the premie graduate. The graduate of the newborn intensive care unit (NICU) frequently enters into the home setting at a physical size which is significantly less than that of the fetus of the same postmenstrual age. Nutrient need may be further altered by gender, ethnicity, hospital course and post hospital clinical status.

The limited number of investigations on nutrition post-hospital discharge differ in their infant population, study diet, duration of study diet, and final results. Post discharge formulas have recently been developed and may meet the nutrient demands for selected premature infants. Continued monitoring of the infant's dietary intake, anthropometric measurements, and clinical status will help to determine if the infant's needs are met or if nutrient supplementation is indicated.

Growth

Premature infants can grow at the fetal growth rate of at least 15 g kg−1day−1 in the NICU. This rate results in growth that parallels fetal growth, but because adequate weight gain commences only after 1–2 weeks it does not result in catch-up growth during the hospital stay. Although most premature infants begin life appropriately grown, they are frequently discharged at a weight less than the 10th percentile for age.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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  • Post-hospital nutrition of the preterm infant
    • By Diane M. Anderson, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, Richard J. Schanler, Schneider Children’s Hospital at North Shore, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
  • Patti J. Thureen, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
  • Edited by William W. Hay, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
  • Book: Neonatal Nutrition and Metabolism
  • Online publication: 10 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544712.047
Available formats
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  • Post-hospital nutrition of the preterm infant
    • By Diane M. Anderson, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, Richard J. Schanler, Schneider Children’s Hospital at North Shore, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
  • Patti J. Thureen, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
  • Edited by William W. Hay, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
  • Book: Neonatal Nutrition and Metabolism
  • Online publication: 10 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544712.047
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Post-hospital nutrition of the preterm infant
    • By Diane M. Anderson, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, Richard J. Schanler, Schneider Children’s Hospital at North Shore, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
  • Patti J. Thureen, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
  • Edited by William W. Hay, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
  • Book: Neonatal Nutrition and Metabolism
  • Online publication: 10 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544712.047
Available formats
×