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The Cambridge Companion to International Law
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Book description

This intellectually rigorous introduction to international law encourages readers to engage with multiple aspects of the topic: as 'law' directing and shaping its subjects; as a technique for governing the world of states and beyond statehood; and as a framework within which several critical and constructivist projects are articulated. The articles situate international law in its historical and ideological context and examine core concepts such as sovereignty, jurisdiction and the state. Attention is also given to its operation within international institutions and in dispute settlement, and a separate section is devoted to international law's 'projects': protecting human rights, eradicating poverty, the conservation of resources, the regulation of international trade and investment and the establishment of international order. The diverse group of contributors draws from disciplinary orientations ranging from positivism to postmodernism to ensure that this book is informed theoretically and politically, as well as grounded in practice.

Reviews

'What makes the book exceptional is the fact that the authors of each chapter present political and theoretical issues from both traditional and critical perspectives, providing valuable insight for a public interested in each field of international law.'

Source: CEU Political Science Journal

'What the Cambridge Companion will do is to introduce the reader to international law’s underlying contradictions, to its regressive tendencies, and to its liberating potential. International law, like all law, is a tool - and as a ‘science of the superstructure’ it is a tool used mainly to conserve and perpetuate the status quo; the Cambridge Companion comes at it from a decidedly critical (read: progressive) bend, exposes its biases, but also demonstrates how ‘small change’ may realise its power to liberate and protect.'

Antonios Tzanakopoulos Source: British Yearbook of International Law

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