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Effect of Sequential Applications of Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides on Palmer Amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) Control and Peanut Response

  • Benjamin P. Sperry (a1), Jason A. Ferrell (a1), Hunter C. Smith (a1), Venancio J. Fernandez (a1), Ramon G. Leon (a2) and Clyde A. Smith (a3)...

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted in 2013 and 2014 in Florida to evaluate the effects of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO)-inhibiting herbicides and single versus sequential applications on Palmer amaranth control and peanut injury. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicides are among the last available herbicides for the POST control of acetolactate synthase (ALS)-resistant Palmer amaranth in peanut. Lactofen (219 g ai ha–1) applied 5 d after the initial application provided the highest level of Palmer amaranth control 7 and 14 d after initial application (DAIT). Delaying sequential applications of lactofen to 15 d resulted in the highest level of Palmer amaranth control 21 and 28 DAIT. Similar to Palmer amaranth control, foliar injury to peanut was often highest from lactofen applications, and by 28 DAIT lactofen treatments were the only treatments that caused foliar injury. Although no statistical difference was observed between yields of plots treated with acifluorfen (280 g ai ha–1), bentazon (560 g ai ha–1), 2,4-DB (280 g ae ha–1) alone or in combination with each other, plots treated with sequential applications of lactofen 5 or 15 DAIT produced the lowest yields. Sequential applications of lactofen applied 15 DAIT controlled Palmer amaranth more effectively than any other treatment but also caused the highest level of peanut injury. The use of sequential applications of lactofen was the most effective method for control of Palmer amaranth in this study, but did reduce peanut yield.

En 2013 y 2014 se realizaron dos experimentos en Florida para evaluar los efectos de los herbicidas inhibidores de protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) y aplicaciones sencillas versus secuenciales sobre el control de Amaranthus palmeri y el daño al maní. Los herbicidas inhibidores de protoporphyrinogen oxidase están entre los últimos herbicidas disponibles para el control POST de A. palmeri resistente a herbicidas inhibidores de acetolactate synthase (ALS) en maní. Lactofen (219 g ai ha−1) aplicado 5 d después de la aplicación inicial (DAIT) brindó el mayor nivel de control de A. palmeri 7 y 14 DAIT. El retrasar las aplicaciones secuenciales de lactofen a 15 d resultó en el mayor nivel de control de A. palmeri 21 a 28 DAIT. Similarmente al control de A. palmeri, el daño foliar en el maní fue frecuentemente más alto con aplicaciones de lactofen, y a 28 DAIT los tratamientos con lactofen fueron los únicos que causaron daño foliar. Aunque no se observaron diferencias estadísticas entre los rendimientos de las parcelas tratadas con acifluorfen (280 g ai ha−1), bentazon (560 g ai ha−1), 2,4-DB (280 g ae ha−1) solos o en combinaciones entre ellos, las parcelas tratadas con aplicaciones secuenciales de lactofen 5 ó 15 DAIT produjeron los menores rendimientos. Las aplicaciones secuenciales de lactofen aplicado 15 DAIT controlaron A. palmeri más efectivamente que cualquier otro tratamiento, pero también causaron el mayor nivel de daño en el maní. El uso de aplicaciones secuenciales de lactofen fue el método más efectivo para controlar A. palmeri en este estudio, pero redujo el rendimiento del maní.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author’s E-mail: jferrell@ufl.edu

Footnotes

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Associate Editor for this paper: Jason Bond, Mississippi State University.

Footnotes

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