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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 October 2017

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Copyright © Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies 2017 

Ben Eklof is Professor of History at Indiana University. He has written on Russian and Soviet education, the peasantry, and the politics of the Great Reform and Perestroika eras. Eklof and Tatiana Saburova are co-authors of Druzhba, Sem΄ia, Revoliutsiia: Nikolai Charushin i pokolenie narodnikov 1870-kh godov (Moscow, Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2016).

John Etty completed a doctoral thesis on Krokodil magazine during the Khrushchev Thaw, considering the journal and its cartoons in relation to theories of carnivalesque humor and satire, transmedia and co-creative production, and performativity. He has recently published on satirical visions of spaceflight in Soviet cartoon art, and his interests also include online political graphic satire in contemporary Russia. He has a career in secondary school education.

Marharyta Fabrykant is a Senior Lecturer at Belarusian State University, Minsk, and a Research Fellow at the National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow. Her research focuses on nationalism and national identity in comparative cross-cultural perspective, with a special focus on east European nation-building and the role of national history narratives.

Evgeny Finkel is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University. He is the author of Ordinary Jews: Choice and Survival during the Holocaust (Princeton University Press, 2017). He studies political violence, east European politics, and Israeli politics.

Elena Fratto is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Princeton University. Her research lies at the intersection of theories of narrative and the history of science (especially medicine, geometry, and astronomy) in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Her book manuscript, “Medical Story-Worlds: Disease, Treatment, and Storytelling from the fin de siècle to the first Five-Year Plan,” addresses the narrative structure of medical knowledge in Russia and beyond in the years 1880–1930.

Jeremy Friedman is Assistant Professor at Harvard Business School. Previously, he was associate director of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy at Yale University, and holds a PhD in History from Princeton University. He is the author of The Shadow Cold War: The Sino-Soviet Competition for the Third World (UNC Press, 2015).

Scott Gehlbach is Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His work is motivated by the contemporary and historical experience of Russia and other postcommunist states. He has contributed to the study of economic reform, autocracy, political connections, and other important topics in political economy.

David L. Hoffmann is College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor of History at The Ohio State University. He is the author of Cultivating the Masses: Modern State Practices and Soviet Socialism, 1914–1939 (Cornell University Press, 2011); Stalinist Values: The Cultural Norms of Soviet Modernity, 1917–1941 (Cornell University Press, 2003); and Peasant Metropolis: Social Identities in Moscow, 1929–1941 (Cornell University Press, 1994). He is also the editor of Stalinism: The Essential Readings (Blackwell Publishers, 2002); and Russian Modernity: Politics, Knowledge, Practices (Macmillan Press Ltd., 2000). He is currently completing The Stalinist Era (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming).

Diane P. Koenker is Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of Moscow Workers and the 1917 Revolution (1981), Strikes and Revolution in Russia, 1917 (1989) (with William G. Rosenberg), Republic of Labor: Russian Printers and Soviet Socialism, 1918–1930 (2005), and Club Red: Vacation Travel and the Soviet Dream (2013). With Anne E. Gorsuch she co-edited Turizm: The Russian and East European Tourist under Capitalism and Socialism (2006).

Dmitrii Kofanov is a Ph.D. student studying comparative politics in the Department of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His main research interests are political economy and the history of pre-1917 Russia.

Joseph Lenkart is the head of the Slavic Reference Service and Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois. He provides vision and leadership for the Slavic Reference Service in support of Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies scholars. The Title VIII grant program funds this service. He is currently working on two manuscripts: “Islam and the Muslim Press in Russia” and “A Struggle for Survival: The Jewish Press in the Early Soviet Period.”

Eric Lohr is Professor and Susan Carmel Lehrman Chair of Russian History and Culture at American University. He is the author of Russian Citizenship: From Empire to Soviet Union (Harvard, 2012) and Nationalizing the Russian Empire: The Campaign against Enemy Aliens during World War I (Harvard, 2003).

Svetlana Malysheva is Professor of Russian history at Institute of International Relations, History and Oriental Studies, Kazan΄ Federal University. She authored books on the history and historiography of the 1917 Russian Revolution and the Civil War, the history of everyday life, 19th–20th centuries, and Russian festive and leisure-time culture. She is currently working on a project titled “The Red Thanatos: The History and Culture of Death in Soviet Russia (1917–1991).”

Roger Markwick is Professor of Modern European History and a founding member of the Centre for the History of Violence at the University of Newcastle, Australia. He is the lead co-author of Soviet Women on the Frontline in the Second World War (Palgrave-McMillan, 2012), shortlisted for the 2013 NSW Premier's History Awards. His Rewriting History in Soviet Russia: The Politics of Revisionist Historiography in the Soviet Union, 1956–1974 (Palgrave-McMillan, 2001) won the BASEES Alexander Nove Prize in 2003. He is currently writing up an Australian Research Council Discovery Project on Soviet women on the home front during the Second World War.

Denis Mel΄nik is Associate Professor in the Department of Theoretical Economics at the National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow. His current research focuses on the history of Russian and Soviet economic thought and on theories of economic development. During recent years, he has been a visiting scholar at the New School for Social Research in New York and Kanagawa University in Japan.

Laurence H. Miller is professor emeritus in the Library of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His current area of research is the history and description of collections in that library. From 1975 to 1989 and from 1997 to the present he has edited the annual reference book section in Slavic Review.

Matthew Rendle is a Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Exeter. He has published Defenders of the Motherland: The Tsarist Elite in Revolutionary Russia (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010) and is currently completing a book tentatively entitled The State versus the People: Revolutionary Justice in Russia's Civil War.

Arturo Zoffmann Rodriguez is a PhD candidate at the European University Institute, Florence. His work focuses on the impact of the Russian Revolution on the Spanish anarchist movement in the years 1917–24, developing his previous MPhil thesis completed at the University of Oxford. His research interests revolve around labor history, the history of anarchism and communism, and the transnational and comparative history of revolutions.

Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild is a Center Associate at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University, a Resident Scholar at the Brandeis University Women's Studies Research Center, the author of Equality and Revolution: Women's Rights in the Russian Empire, 1905–1917 (Pittsburgh, 2010), an Editor of the journal Aspasia, and an Executive Producer of the documentary film “Left on Pearl.”

Peter Rutland is Professor, Wesleyan University, and Visiting Leverhulme Professor at the University of Manchester (2016). He is editor-in-chief of Nationalities Papers and associate editor of Russian Review. Recent articles include: “Neoliberalism in Russia,” Review of International Political Economy 20, no. 2 (April 2013): 332–62; “Russia's Place in a Globalizing World,” Communist and Post-Communist Studies 45, no. 3 (Sept 2012): 343–54.

Tatiana Saburova is a Research Fellow at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. She has published extensively on the cultural history of the Russian intelligentsia. Her current research focuses on the history of photography in late Imperial Russia, biography, autobiography, and memory. Saburova and Ben Eklof are co-authors of Druzhba, Sem΄ia, Revoliutsiia: Nikolai Charushin i pokolenie narodnikov 1870-kh godov (Moscow, Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2016).

Joshua Sanborn is Professor of History at Lafayette College. His most recent monograph is Imperial Apocalypse: The Great War and the Destruction of the Russian Empire (Oxford, 2014), which examines wartime processes of state failure, social collapse, violent transformation, and imperial disintegration through the lens of decolonization.

Jennifer Wilson is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pennsylvania. She is currently working on two book manuscripts: Radical Chastity: Abstinence and the Political Imagination in 19th Century Russian Literature and Writing the Black Atlantic in Imperial Russia.

Elizabeth A. Wood is Professor of Russian and Soviet History at MIT, where she also directs the Russian Studies Program. Her books include Roots of Russia's War in Ukraine (coauthored) (Woodrow Wilson Center/Columbia University Press, 2016); Performing Justice: Agitation Trials in Early Soviet Russia (Cornell University Press, 2005); and The Baba and the Comrade: Gender and Politics in Revolutionary Russia (Indiana University Press, 1997). Most recently she has been working on Vladimir Putin's scenarios of power.

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