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Effects of initiating moderate wine intake on abdominal adipose tissue in adults with type 2 diabetes: a 2-year randomized controlled trial

  • Rachel Golan (a1), Ilan Shelef (a2), Elad Shemesh (a2), Yaakov Henkin (a2), Dan Schwarzfuchs (a3), Yftach Gepner (a1), Ilana Harman-Boehm (a2), Shula Witkow (a1), Michael Friger (a1), Yoash Chassidim (a2), Idit F Liberty (a2), Benjamin Sarusi (a3), Dana Serfaty (a1), Nitzan Bril (a1), Michal Rein (a1), Noa Cohen (a1), Sivan Ben-Avraham (a1), Uta Ceglarek (a4), Michael Stumvoll (a4), Matthias Blüher (a4), Joachim Thiery (a4), Meir J Stampfer (a5), Assaf Rudich (a1) and Iris Shai (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To generate evidence-based conclusions about the effect of wine consumption on weight gain and abdominal fat accumulation and distribution in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Design

In the 2-year randomized controlled CASCADE (CArdiovaSCulAr Diabetes & Ethanol) trial, patients following a Mediterranean diet were randomly assigned to drink 150 ml of mineral water, white wine or red wine with dinner for 2 years. Visceral adiposity and abdominal fat distribution were measured in a subgroup of sixty-five participants, using abdominal MRI.

Setting

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Soroka-Medical Center and the Nuclear Research Center Negev, Israel.

Subjects

Alcohol-abstaining adults with well-controlled type 2 diabetes.

Results

Forty-eight participants (red wine, n 27; mineral water, n 21) who completed a second MRI measurement were included in the 2-year analysis. Similar weight losses (sd) were observed: red wine 1·3 (3·9) kg; water 1·0 (4·2) kg (P=0·8 between groups). Changes (95 % CI) in abdominal adipose-tissue distribution were similar: red wine, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) −3·0 (−8·0, 2·0) %, deep subcutaneous adipose tissue (DSAT) +5·2 (−1·1, 11·6) %, superficial subcutaneous adipose tissue (SSAT) −1·9 (−5·0, 1·2) %; water, VAT −3·2 (−8·9, 2·5) %, DSAT +2·9 (−2·8, 8·6) %, SSAT −0·15 (−3·3, 2·9) %. No changes in antidiabetic medication and no substantial changes in energy intake (+126 (sd 2889) kJ/d (+30·2 (sd 690) kcal/d), P=0·8) were recorded. A 2-year decrease in glycated Hb (β=0·28, P=0·05) was associated with a decrease in VAT.

Conclusions

Moderate wine consumption, as part of a Mediterranean diet, in persons with controlled diabetes did not promote weight gain or abdominal adiposity.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email golanra@bgu.ac.il

References

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