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Biomarker-predicted sugars intake compared with self-reported measures in US Hispanics/Latinos: results from the HCHS/SOL SOLNAS study

  • JM Beasley (a1), M Jung (a2), N Tasevska (a3), WW Wong (a4), AM Siega-Riz (a5), D Sotres-Alvarez (a6), MD Gellman (a7), JR Kizer (a8), PA Shaw (a9), J Stamler (a10), M Stoutenberg (a11), L Van Horn (a10), AA Franke (a12), J Wylie-Rosett (a8) and Y Mossavar-Rahmani (a8)...

Abstract

Objective

Measurement error in self-reported total sugars intake may obscure associations between sugars consumption and health outcomes, and the sum of 24 h urinary sucrose and fructose may serve as a predictive biomarker of total sugars intake.

Design

The Study of Latinos: Nutrition & Physical Activity Assessment Study (SOLNAS) was an ancillary study to the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) cohort. Doubly labelled water and 24 h urinary sucrose and fructose were used as biomarkers of energy and sugars intake, respectively. Participants’ diets were assessed by up to three 24 h recalls (88 % had two or more recalls). Procedures were repeated approximately 6 months after the initial visit among a subset of ninety-six participants.

Setting

Four centres (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) across the USA.

Subjects

Men and women (n 477) aged 18–74 years.

Results

The geometric mean of total sugars was 167·5 (95 % CI 154·4, 181·7) g/d for the biomarker-predicted and 90·6 (95 % CI 87·6, 93·6) g/d for the self-reported total sugars intake. Self-reported total sugars intake was not correlated with biomarker-predicted sugars intake (r=−0·06, P=0·20, n 450). Among the reliability sample (n 90), the reproducibility coefficient was 0·59 for biomarker-predicted and 0·20 for self-reported total sugars intake.

Conclusions

Possible explanations for the lack of association between biomarker-predicted and self-reported sugars intake include measurement error in self-reported diet, high intra-individual variability in sugars intake, and/or urinary sucrose and fructose may not be a suitable proxy for total sugars intake in this study population.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email jeannette.beasley@nyumc.org

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Biomarker-predicted sugars intake compared with self-reported measures in US Hispanics/Latinos: results from the HCHS/SOL SOLNAS study

  • JM Beasley (a1), M Jung (a2), N Tasevska (a3), WW Wong (a4), AM Siega-Riz (a5), D Sotres-Alvarez (a6), MD Gellman (a7), JR Kizer (a8), PA Shaw (a9), J Stamler (a10), M Stoutenberg (a11), L Van Horn (a10), AA Franke (a12), J Wylie-Rosett (a8) and Y Mossavar-Rahmani (a8)...

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