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Association between dietary patterns and blood lipid profiles among Chinese women

  • Jiguo Zhang (a1), Zhihong Wang (a1), Huijun Wang (a1), Wenwen Du (a1), Chang Su (a1), Ji Zhang (a1), Hongru Jiang (a1), Xiaofang Jia (a1), Feifei Huang (a1), Fengying Zhai (a1) (a2) and Bing Zhang (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

The present study aimed to identify dietary patterns and explore their associations with blood lipid profiles among Chinese women.

Design

In a cross-sectional study, we identified dietary patterns using principal component analysis of data from three consecutive 24 h dietary recalls. The China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) collected blood samples in the morning after an overnight fast and measured total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and TAG.

Setting

Data were from the 2009 wave of the CHNS.

Subjects

We studied 2468 women aged 18–80 years from the CHNS.

Results

We identified three dietary patterns: traditional southern (high intakes of rice, pork and vegetables), snack (high intakes of fruits, eggs and cakes) and Western (high intakes of poultry, fast foods and milk). The traditional southern pattern was inversely associated with HDL-C (β=−0·68; 95 % CI −1·22, −0·14; P<0·05). The snack pattern was significantly associated with higher TAG (β=4·14; 95 % CI 0·44, 7·84; P<0·05). The Western pattern was positively associated with TC (β=2·52; 95 % CI 1·03, 4·02; P<0·01) and LDL-C (β=2·26; 95 % CI 0·86, 3·66; P<0·01).

Conclusions

We identified three dietary patterns that are significantly associated with blood lipid profiles. This information is important for developing interventions and policies addressing dyslipidaemia prevention among Chinese women.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email zzhangb327@aliyun.com

References

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