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In vivo haploid induction potential of Himalayan maize (Zea mays) and cogon grass (Imperata cylindrica) gene pools in different segregational cycles of intra and inter-generic crosses of wheat

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 January 2022

Chandan Kapoor*
Affiliation:
Division of Genetics, ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Pusa, New Delhi-110012, India
Harinder Kumar Chaudhary
Affiliation:
Department of Crop Improvement, Molecular Cytogenetics and Tissue Culture Laboratory, CSK-Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh-176062, India
Parul Sharma
Affiliation:
Department of Crop Improvement, Molecular Cytogenetics and Tissue Culture Laboratory, CSK-Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh-176062, India
Ashima Relan
Affiliation:
Department of Crop Improvement, Molecular Cytogenetics and Tissue Culture Laboratory, CSK-Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh-176062, India
N. V. Manoj
Affiliation:
Department of Crop Improvement, Molecular Cytogenetics and Tissue Culture Laboratory, CSK-Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh-176062, India
Kritika Singh
Affiliation:
Department of Crop Improvement, Molecular Cytogenetics and Tissue Culture Laboratory, CSK-Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh-176062, India
Vinod Kumar Sood
Affiliation:
Department of Crop Improvement, Molecular Cytogenetics and Tissue Culture Laboratory, CSK-Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh-176062, India
*
Author for correspondence: Chandan Kapoor, E-mail: chandannaarm@gmail.com

Abstract

Maize and Imperata cylindrica have been utilized globally as a pollen source for induction of haploids in wheat through chromosome elimination technique. Pollen parents with a higher haploid induction rate are desired for recovering the high frequency of haploids in wheat and related species. The present investigation was carried out with the aim to assess haploid induction efficiency of diverse germplasm of maize and I. cylindrica in different generations of intra and intergeneric crosses of hexaploid and tetraploid wheat and triticale-wheat derivatives. Crosses of twenty-six lines (female) with each of two I. cylindrica and twenty-one maize genotypes (testers) were evaluated for four haploid induction parameters viz., pseudoseed formation frequency (PFF), embryo formation frequency (EFF), haploid regeneration frequency (HRF) and haploid formation frequency (HFF). I. cylindrica outperformed maize in haploid induction rate with a frequency of embryos formed with I. cylindrica (18.39%) were significantly higher as compared to maize (4.08%). In the case of I. cylindrica genotype Ic-ye identified best with mean EFF of 30.55, 14.48 and 25.43% for hexaploids, tetraploids and triticale × wheat derivatives, respectively whereas in the case of maize genotype HPMC-60 performed best with EFF of 12.61% for hexaploids, HPMC-58 (12.58%) for tetraploids and HPMC-16 for triticale × wheat derivatives with EFF of 8.91%. I. cylindrica genotype Ic-ye and maize genotypes HPMC-14, HPMC-53, HPMC-60, HPMC-64 with significantly positive GCA for haploid induction parameters may be utilized as efficient pollen parents for recovering higher frequency of haploids in wheat.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of NIAB

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In vivo haploid induction potential of Himalayan maize (Zea mays) and cogon grass (Imperata cylindrica) gene pools in different segregational cycles of intra and inter-generic crosses of wheat
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In vivo haploid induction potential of Himalayan maize (Zea mays) and cogon grass (Imperata cylindrica) gene pools in different segregational cycles of intra and inter-generic crosses of wheat
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