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Expression changes in the TaNAC2 and TaNAC69-1 transcription factors in drought stress tolerant and susceptible accessions of Triticum boeoticum

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 September 2019

Maryam Nazari
Affiliation:
Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding, Faculty of Agriculture, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran
Kiarash Jamshidi Goharrizi
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Breeding, Yazd Branch, Islamic Azad University, Yazd, Iran
Sayyed Saeed Moosavi
Affiliation:
Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding, Faculty of Agriculture, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran
Mahmood Maleki
Affiliation:
Department of Biotechnology, Institute of Science and High Technology and Environmental Science, Graduate University of Advanced Technology, Kerman, Iran
Corresponding

Abstract

Triticum boeoticum is a valuable gene source for tolerance to drought stress. In order to study the effect of drought stress on this plant, and to understand its adaptive mechanisms at the molecular level, 10 accessions of T. boeoticum were evaluated under non- and drought stress conditions. Evaluation of 31 different phenological, morpho-physiological and root-related traits showed that there were significant differences between accessions. Using the bi-plot resulting from the PCA, the studied traits and accessions were separated in different groups. The most tolerant (B5) and susceptible (B6) accessions to drought stress were identified, so these accessions were used for assessment of changes in the TaNAC2 and TaNAC69-1 transcription factors (TFs) expression. The results showed that in the most tolerant and susceptible accessions, TaNAC2 and TaNAC69-1 expression levels increased between non-stress and stress conditions significantly, but the increased level of these two genes expression in the most tolerant accession was much higher than the most susceptible accession. According to the obtained results, T. boeoticum can be a suitable and promising gene source for improving modern wheat. In addition, the results of TFs expression could improve our understanding about the complex mechanisms associated with drought tolerance in wheat, especially wild wheat.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © NIAB 2019

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Footnotes

Maryam Nazari and Kiarash Jamshidi Goharrizi contributed equally to this work as co-first authors.

References

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Expression changes in the TaNAC2 and TaNAC69-1 transcription factors in drought stress tolerant and susceptible accessions of Triticum boeoticum
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Expression changes in the TaNAC2 and TaNAC69-1 transcription factors in drought stress tolerant and susceptible accessions of Triticum boeoticum
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