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Correlation between Tapping and Inserting of Pegs in Parkinson's Disease

  • Thomas Müller (a1), Sandra Schäfer (a1), Wilfried Kuhn (a1) and Horst Przuntek (a1)

Abstract

Background:

Various investigators have developed complex quantitative instrumental procedures for objective assessment of parkinsonian motor impairment, since drawbacks of rating scales are interrater variability, subjective impression, and insensitivity to subtle modifications. Objectives: To determine whether performance of inserting of pegs and tapping (i) correlates with each other (ii) differentiates between parkinsonian subjects and healthy controls and (iii) reflects severity of Parkinson's disease (PD). Subjects and

Methods:

In 157 previously untreated idiopathic parkinsonian patients and healthy controls, we measured (i) the total time taken to insert 25 pegs from a rack into a series of appropriate holes in a Purdue pegboard-like apparatus and (ii) the number of taps on a contact board with a contact pencil for a period of 32 seconds for assessment of fine motor skills.

Results:

Results of both tests correlated with each other, differed between parkinsonian subjects and controls and reflected scored severity of PD. Better correlation with intensity of PD was noted with the Purdue pegboard-like task.

Conclusion:

Both tapping and inserting of pegs represent useful tools for objective evaluation of severity of PD. Peg insertion correlated better with disease severity. Both approaches may be useful in future clinical studies.

RÉSUMÉ: Introduction:

Différents investigateurs ont développé des méthodes instrumentales quantitatives complexes pour l'évaluation objective du déficit moteur parkinsonien à cause des inconvénients inhérents aux échelles d'évaluation, soit la variabilité entre les observateurs, la subjectivité et le peu de sensibilité à des modifications subtiles.

Objectifs:

Déterminer si la performance au tapping et à la planche à chevilles (i) sont en corrélées (ii) identifie les parkinsoniens et les contrôles et (iii) reflète la sévérité de la maladie de Parkinson (MP).

Sujets et Méthodes:

Nous avons mesuré (i) le temps total pour transférer 25 chevilles d'un support à une série de trous appropriés dans une planche à chevilles de type Purdue et (ii) le nombre de percussions avec un stylet sur une surface de contact pendant une période de 32 secondes pour évaluer la motricité fine chez 157 patients atteints de MP idiopathique jamais traités.

Résultats:

Les résultats de ces deux tests étaient corrélés entre eux, différaient entre les parkinsoniens et les contrôles et reflétaient la sévérité de la MP. Une meilleure corrélation a été observée entre la sévérité de la MP et la performance à la planche à chevilles de type Purdue.

Conclusion:

Le tapping et la planche à chevilles sont des outils utiles pour évaluer objectivement la sévérité de la MP. La performance à la planche à chevilles a une meilleure corrélation avec la sévérité de la maladie. Les deux approches pourraient s'avérer utiles lors d'études cliniques ultérieures.

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References

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Correlation between Tapping and Inserting of Pegs in Parkinson's Disease

  • Thomas Müller (a1), Sandra Schäfer (a1), Wilfried Kuhn (a1) and Horst Przuntek (a1)

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