Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Differences in energy metabolism between normal weight ‘large-eating’ and ‘small-eating’ women

  • Dalas Clark (a1), Frank Tomas (a1), Robert T. Withers (a2), M. Brinkman (a1), Colin Chandler (a1), John Phillips (a3), F. John Ballard (a1), Michael N. Berry (a3) and Paul Nestel (a1)...

Abstract

Nine ‘large-eating’ (approximately 12 MJ/d) and nine ‘small-eating’ (approximately 5.3 MJ/d) women were selected from the population on the basis of diet and activity diaries. At rest and in the post-absorptive state the rate of oxygen consumption (Vo2)/kg fat-free mass (FFM) and rate of carbon dioxide production (Vco2)/kg FFM were 9–17% higher (P < 0.05) in the ‘large-eaters’ than in the ‘small-eaters’. As energy expenditure was increased by walking at 2.4, 3.9 and 5.4 km/h the differences between the two experimental groups for both Vo2/kg FFM and Vco2/kg FFM were decreased to negligible values, but energy expended on a body-weight basis (MJ/kg per min) remained significantly higher (5–10%) in ‘large-eaters’. Oral temperature was also consistently higher (up to 0.5°) in this group both at rest and during sitting, standing and walking activities. Although the average thermic effect of a standardized liquid meal tended to be higher (27%; not significant) in the ‘small-eaters’, the other results demonstrate that the ‘large-eating’ females had a markedly higher rate of energy expenditure at rest and during light physical activities.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Differences in energy metabolism between normal weight ‘large-eating’ and ‘small-eating’ women
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Differences in energy metabolism between normal weight ‘large-eating’ and ‘small-eating’ women
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Differences in energy metabolism between normal weight ‘large-eating’ and ‘small-eating’ women
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Acheson, K. J., Campbell, I. T., Edholm, O. G., Miller, D. S. & Stock, M. J. (1980). The measurement of food and energy intake in man – an evaluation of some techniques. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 33, 11471154.
Baghurst, K. I. & Baghurst, P. A. (1981). The measurement of usual dietary intake in individuals and groups. Transactions of the Menzies Foundation 3, 139160.
Bergmeyer, H. U. (1974). Methods of Enzymatic Analysis, 2nd ed. New York: Academic Press.
Bessard, T., Schutz, Y. & Jéquier, E. (1983). Energy expenditure and postprandial thermogenesis in obese women before and after weight loss. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 38, 680693.
Blair, D. & Buskirk, E. R. (1987). Habitual daily energy expenditure and activity levels of lean and adult-onset and child-onset obese women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 45, 540550.
Blaza, S. & Garrow, J. S. (1983). Thermogenic response to temperature, exercise and food stimuli in lean and obese women, studied by 24 h direct calorimetry. British Journal of Nutrition 49, 171180.
Butcher, R. W., Robison, G. A. & Sutherland, E. W. (1972). Cyclic AMP and hormone action. In Biochemical Action of Hormones, vol. 2, pp. 2150 [G. Litwak, editor]. New York and London: Academic Press.
Clark, D., Lee, D., Rognstad, R. & Katz, J. (1975). Futile cycles in isolated perfused rat liver and in isolated rat liver parenchymal cells. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 67, 212219.
Clark, M. G., Bloxham, D. P., Holland, P. C. & Lardy, H. A. (1974). Estimation of the fructose-1,6-diphosphatase-phosphofructokinase substrate cycle and its relationship to gluconeogenesis in rat liver in vivo. Journal of Biological Chemistry 249, 279290.
Daughaday, W. H., Mariz, I. K. & Blethen, S. L. (1980). Inhibition of access of bound somatomedin to membrane receptor and immunobinding sites: a comparison of radioreceptor and radioimmunoassay of somatomedin in native and acid-ethanol extracted serum. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 51, 781788.
De Boer, J. O., Van Es, A. J. H., Van Raaji, J. M. A. & Hautvast, J. G. A. J. (1987). Energy requirements and energy expenditure of lean and overweight women, measured by indirect calorimetry. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 46, 1321.
Dore, C., Hesp, R., Wilkins, D. & Garrow, J. S. (1982). Prediction of energy requirements of obese patients after massive weight loss. Human Nutrition: Clinical Nutrition 36C, 4148.
Felig, P., Cunningham, J., Levitt, M., Hendler, R. & Nadel, E. (1983). Energy expenditure in obesity in fasting and postprandial state. American Journal of Physiology 244, E45–E51.
Fern, E. B., Garlick, P. J., McNurlan, M. A. & Waterlow, J. C. (1981). The excretion of isotope in urea and ammonia for estimating protein turnover in man with [15N]glycine. Clinical Science 61, 217228.
Francis, G. L., McNeil, K., Wallace, J. C., Ballard, F. J. & Owens, P. C. (1989). Sheep insulin-like growth factors I and II. Endocrinology 124, 11731183.
Fritz, I. B. (1972). Insulin actions on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In Biochemical Action of Hormones, vol. 2, pp. 166209 [G. Litwak, editor]. New York and London: Academic Press.
Garrow, J. S. (1985). Resting metabolic rate as a determinant of energy expenditure in man. In Substrate and Energy Metabolism in Man, [Garrow, J. S. and Halliday, P., editors]. London: John Libbey.
Geissler, C. A., Miller, D. S. & Shah, M. (1987). The daily metabolic rate of the post-obese and the lean. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 45, 914920.
Goldman, R. F. & Buskirk, E. R. (1961). Body volume measurement by underwater weighing: description of a method. In Techniques for Measuring Body Composition, pp. 7889 [Brozek, J. and Henschel, A., editors]. Washington: National Academy of Sciences National Research Council.
Haldane, J. S. (1912). Methods of Air Analysis. London: Charles Griffin.
Hoffman, M., Pfeiffer, W. A., Gundlach, B. L., Nijkrake, H. G. M., Oude Ophuis, A. J. M. & Hautvast, J. G. A. J. (1979). Resting metabolic rate in obese and normal-weight women. International Journal of Obesity 3, 111118.
Isaksson, B. (1980). Urinary nitrogen output as a validity test in dietary surveys. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 33, 45.
James, W. P. T., Haggarty, P. & McGaw, B. A. (1988). Recent progress in studies on energy expenditure: are the new methods providing answers to the old questions? Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 47, 195208.
Katz, J. & Rognstad, R. (1976). Futile cycles in the metabolism of glucose. Current Topics in Cellular Regulation 10, 237289.
Livingstone, M. B. E., Prentice, A. M., Strain, J. J., Coward, W. A., Black, A. E., Barker, M. E., McKenna, P. G. & Whitehead, R. G. (1990). Accuracy of weighed dietary records in studies of diet and health. British Medical Journal 300, 708712.
McArdle, W. D., Katch, F. I. & Katch, V. L. (1986). Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition and Human Performance, 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.
McCance, R. A. & Widdowson, E. M. (1978). The Composition of Foods, 4th ed. London: H.M. Stationery Office.
McNeil, G., McBride, A., Smith, J. S. & James, W. P. T. (1989). Energy expenditure in large and small eaters. Nutrition Research 9, 363372.
Marr, J. W. (1971). Individual dietary surveys: purposes and methods. World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics 13, 105164.
Meneely, G. R. & Kaltreider, N. L. (1949). The volume of the lung determined by helium dilution: description of the method and comparison with other procedures. Journal of Clinical Investigation 28, 129139.
Miller, D. S., Mumford, P. & Stock, M. J. (1967). Gluttony 2. Thermogenesis in overeating man. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 20, 12231229.
Newsholme, E. A. (1980). A possible metabolic basis for the control of body weight. New England Journal of Medicine 299, 400404.
Oliver, J. R., Williams, V. & Wright, P. H. (1976). Studies on glucagon secretion using isolated islets of Langerhans. Diahetologia 12, 301306.
Owen, O. E., Kavle, E. & Owen, R. S. (1986). A reappraisal of caloric requirements in healthy women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 44, 119.
Passmore, R. & Durnin, J. V. G. A. (1955). Human energy expenditure. Physiological Reviews 35, 801840.
Ravussin, E., Burnand, B., Schutz, Y. & Jéquier, E. (1982). Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure and resting metabolic rate in obese, moderately obese, and control subjects. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 35, 566573.
Rose, G. A. & Williams, R. T. (1961). Metabolic studies on large and small eaters. British Journal of Nutrition 15, 19.
Rothwell, N. J., Saville, M. E. & Stock, M. J. (1982). Factors influencing the acute effect of food on oxygen consumption in the rat. International Journal of Obesity 6, 5359.
Schoeller, D. A. & Van Santen, E. (1982). Measurement of energy expenditure in humans by doubly-labelled water method. Journal of Applied Physiology 53, 955959.
Schutz, Y., Bessard, T. & Jéquier, E. (1984). Diet-induced thermogenesis measured over a whole day in obese and nonobese women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 40, 542552.
Segal, K. R. & Gutin, B. (1983). Thermic effects of food and exercise in lean and obese women. Metabolism 32, 581589.
Segal, K. R., Lacayanga, I., Dunaif, A., Gutin, B. & Pi-Sunyer, F. X. (1989). Impact of body fat mass and percent fat on metabolic rate and thermogenesis in men. American Journal of Physiology 256, E573–E579.
Shah, M., Miller, D. S. & Geissler, C. A. (1988). Lower metabolic rates of post-obese versus lean women: thermogenesis, basal metabolic rate and genetics. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 42, 741752.
Siri, W. E. (1961). Body composition from fluid spaces and density: analysis of methods. In Techniques for Measuring Body Composition, pp. 223244 [Brozek, J. and Henschel, A., editors]. Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences National Research Council.
Thompson, G. N. & Tomas, F. M. (1987). Protein metabolism in cystic fibrosis: responses to malnutrition and taurine supplementation. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 46, 606613.
Warwick, P. M. (1978). The influence of physical activity on energy expenditure in man, and its role in the treatment of obesity. PhD Thesis, University of London.
Warwick, P. M., Edmundson, H. M. & Thompson, E. S. (1988). Prediction of energy expenditure: simplified FAO/WHO/UNU factorial method vs.. continuous respirometry and habitual energy intake. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 48, 11881196.
Widdowson, E. M. (1947). A Study of Individual Children's Diets. Medical Research Council Special Report Series no. 257. London: H.M. Stationery Office.
Widdowson, E. M. (1962). Nutritional individuality. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 21, 121128.

Keywords

Differences in energy metabolism between normal weight ‘large-eating’ and ‘small-eating’ women

  • Dalas Clark (a1), Frank Tomas (a1), Robert T. Withers (a2), M. Brinkman (a1), Colin Chandler (a1), John Phillips (a3), F. John Ballard (a1), Michael N. Berry (a3) and Paul Nestel (a1)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed