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The times they are a-changing?

  • Tim Sparks (a1) and Humphrey Crick (a2)

Extract

It is clear from recent research that changes are occurring in the timing of many natural events. In most cases it is assumed that the changes, or most of them, are climate related, although associated changes in distribution, habitat quantity and quality, and population size must not be ignored. In this article we present our opinion that study of the timing of features of life cycles is vital in helping to predict the effects of climate change on wildlife. It represents cheap science and yet is extraordinarily good value for money because it generally relies on geographically widespread networks of volunteer observers. The consequences of phenological changes are large and conservationists ignore them at the peril of the wildlife they seek to conserve.

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Copyright

References

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The times they are a-changing?

  • Tim Sparks (a1) and Humphrey Crick (a2)

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