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  • ISSN: 1366-7289 (Print), 1469-1841 (Online)
  • Editors: Jubin Abutalebi Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Italy, and Harald Clahsen Potsdam Research Institute for Multilingualism, Germany
  • Editorial board
Bilingualism: Language and Cognition is an international peer-reviewed journal focusing on bilingualism from a linguistic, psycholinguistic, and neuroscientific perspective. The aims of the journal are to promote research on the bilingual and multilingual person and to encourage debate in the field. Areas covered include: bilingual language competence, bilingual language processing, bilingual language acquisition in children and adults, bimodal bilingualism, neurolinguistics of bilingualism in normal and brain-damaged individuals, computational modelling of bilingual language competence and performance, and the study of cognitive functions in bilinguals. The journal maintains an inclusive attitude to research involving all languages, and we specifically encourage the study of less well researched languages (including especially minority and minoritized languages) to increase our understanding of how language and cognition interact in the bilingual individual. BLC carries articles and research notes on all aspects of the bilingual person, including articles presenting research methods and research tools pertinent to the field of bilingualism, such as Li et al.’s Language history questionnaire (BLC 17 (3), 2014, 673-680) and other bilingualism tests.

Recently published articles




Other psycholinguistics journals from Cambridge

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • “Life as a Bilingual” – a highly successful blog and now a new Cambridge book
  • 13 October 2021, Eleanor Hennerley
  • Back in 2016, Cambridge Extra published an interview [1] of François Grosjean [2], a recognized expert on bilingualism, who talked about his Psychology Today blog, “Life as a Bilingual”[3] which he had started back in 2010. He discussed a number of topics such as why it is important to have scientific blogs for the general public, the difficulties of writing posts so as to make them appealing without losing any scientific value, what makes a post successful, and so on. He has kindly accepted to answer our questions five years later, both on the current status of his blog and on the book that followed it. Can you remind us why it is that you started a blog? I did so for a number of reasons. First, . . . → Read More: “Life as a Bilingual” – a highly successful blog and now a new Cambridge book...
  • 25 years of English Language and Linguistics
  • 13 July 2021, Jen Malat
  • English Language and Linguistics has reached volume 25. We four current editors are proud to be associated with the journal, and – in celebration of this quarter-century ELL was founded in the mid-1990s (with first publication in 1997) by Bas Aarts, David Denison and Richard Hogg. They wrote in their editors’ note in the first issue that they began the journal because of a perceived need to offer a forum which “covers the range that ELL is intended to cover, a ‘natural class’ of research interests which deserves to be treated in one place”. They described this . . . → Read More: 25 years of English Language and Linguistics...
  • Verbal hugs don’t lie
  • 31 May 2021, Dan Iredale
  • Written by Martina Wiltschko (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona) When we talk to each other, we interact in ways that go beyond telling each other about ourselves and the world around us. We let our interlocutors know what we think and how we feel; we can share our attitudes towards each other and the things we talk about. We do this by using language dedicated to interaction and which does not contribute to the content of what we say. The mood of a conversation changes dramatically when the language of content (you made it) is enriched with interactional language (oh wow), bold-face in (1-2). (1) Ann: Oh wow, you made it, eh? Beth: I know, right? (2) Charlie: Damn. I’m sick. Dorian: Oh no! Get better, okay? Without interactional language the . . . → Read More: Verbal hugs don’t lie...

  


  

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