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  • ISSN: 0267-1905 (Print), 1471-6356 (Online)
  • Editor: Alison Mackey Georgetown University, USA
  • Editorial board
The Annual Review of Applied Linguistics publishes research on key topics in the broad field of applied linguistics. Each issue is thematic, providing a variety of perspectives on the topic through research summaries, critical overviews, position papers and empirical studies. Being responsive to the field, some issues are tied to the theme of that year's annual conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics. Also, at regular intervals an issue will take the approach of covering applied linguistics as a field more broadly, including coverage of critical or controversial topics. ARAL provides cutting-edge and timely articles on a wide number of areas, including language learning and pedagogy, second language acquisition, sociolinguistics, language policy and planning, language assessment, and research design and methodology, to name just a few.

AAAL Webinar: Race, Racial Justice and Indigenous Language Revitalization

Friday, July 10, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM (EDT), Online. Webinar open to all AAAL members. Discover more here

A special Summer webinar considering the role of race in Applied Linguistics. Three authors of articles published in the latest volume of ARAL (see below) share their work on race, racial justice and decolonization, and language revitalization. 

African Americans in World Language Study: The Forged Path and Future Directions
Uju Anya

Indigenous Language Revitalization and Applied Linguistics: Parallel Histories, Shared Futures?
Onowa McIvor

Is an Antiracist and Decolonizing Applied Linguistics Possible?
Suhanthie Motha

Other applied linguistics journals from Cambridge

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • The Cambridge Studies of Language Practices and Social Development
  • 15 June 2020, Rachel
  • The Cambridge Studies of Language Practices and Social Development series provides a needed platform for scholarly discussions around the relationship between Cambridge Extra spoke to the series editor Meng Ji (The University of Sydney, Australia) about the series. What has motivated the development of the series? Our series promotes innovative focused research to address practical social problems such as global environmental, health and legal issues which represent new research challenges, as well as opportunities for socially oriented language practice research. This . . . → Read More: The Cambridge Studies of Language Practices and Social Development...
  • Black Lives Matter
  • 11 June 2020, Rachel
  • Written by Karen Stollznow, author of ‘On the Offensive‘ What do people mean when they say, “Black Lives Matter?” “Black Lives Matter” is a slogan and a social movement in response to the historical and current social and systemic racism and violence perpetuated against Black people. Where did the phrase come from? In 2012, 17-year-old African-American Trayvon Martin was walking home in Sanford, Florida, having just purchased a packet of Skittles from a convenience store. He was spotted by local resident George Zimmerman who reported Martin to local police as “suspicious.” Martin was innocent of any crime, although Zimmerman confronted the young man and fatally shot him, claiming the act was in self-defense. He was acquitted of his crime. Following this incident the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter . . . → Read More: Black Lives Matter...
  • Introducing Cambridge Elements in Pragmatics
  • 02 June 2020, Rachel
  • Cambridge Elements combine the best features of journals and books. With a word count between 20,000-30,000 words they lend themselves to the digital and ever changing research environment. A series coming soon to linguistics is Elements in Pragmatics edited by Jonathan Culpeper, Lancaster University and Michael Haugh, University of Queensland. Cambridge Extra asked them more about the series. What motivated you to collate this Elements series? The format itself is really appealing. It is longer than typical journal articles but shorter than a monograph, so is ideal for both graduate students and established researchers in the field. It also allows authors to publish their work at its natural length, if an article is too constraining yet a full book is over the horizon. Its digital format means the . . . → Read More: Introducing Cambridge Elements in Pragmatics...