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Effects of varying proportions of concentrates on ruminal-reducing power and bacterial community structure in dry dairy cows fed hay-based diets

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 May 2010

C. Julien
Affiliation:
INPT, ENVT. UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Université de Toulouse, ENSAT, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan Cedex, France INRA-PHASE, UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Chemin de Borde-Rouge, Auzeville, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
J. P. Marden
Affiliation:
Lesaffre Feed Additives, 90 rue de Lille, F-59520 Marquette-Lez-Lille, France
C. Bonnefont
Affiliation:
INPT, ENVT. UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Université de Toulouse, ENSAT, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan Cedex, France INRA-PHASE, UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Chemin de Borde-Rouge, Auzeville, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
R. Moncoulon
Affiliation:
INPT, ENVT. UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Université de Toulouse, ENSAT, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan Cedex, France INRA-PHASE, UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Chemin de Borde-Rouge, Auzeville, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
E. Auclair
Affiliation:
Lesaffre Feed Additives, 90 rue de Lille, F-59520 Marquette-Lez-Lille, France
V. Monteils
Affiliation:
INPT, ENVT. UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Université de Toulouse, ENSAT, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan Cedex, France INRA-PHASE, UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Chemin de Borde-Rouge, Auzeville, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
C. Bayourthe
Affiliation:
INPT, ENVT. UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Université de Toulouse, ENSAT, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan Cedex, France INRA-PHASE, UMR 1289 Tandem, Tissus Animaux, Nutrition, Digestion, Ecosystème et Métabolisme, Chemin de Borde-Rouge, Auzeville, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan, France
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Abstract

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of diet composition on ruminal parameters, more particularly redox potential (Eh). Four Holstein dry dairy cows, fitted with ruminal cannulas, were allocated in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. They were given four experimental hay-based diets D0, D25, D42 and D56 consisting of 0%, 25%, 42% and 56% of ground wheat and barley concentrate mixture, respectively. They were fed at a daily feeding rate of 8.0 kg DM per cow during a 24-day experimental period (a 21-day diet adaptation, three consecutive days of measurement and sampling). The physicochemical parameters, such as pH and Eh, were measured and Clark’s exponent (rH) was calculated from 1 h before feeding to 8 h after feeding at 1-h interval. Samples of ruminal fluid were taken at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after feeding for the determination of volatile fatty acid (VFA) and ammonia N (NH3-N) concentrations. Ruminal bacterial populations were also studied by means of capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) technique to focus on the structure of the ruminal microbiota and the diversity index was calculated. Mean ruminal Eh and rH were not modified by the concentrate-to-forage ratio and averaged – 210 mV and 6.30, respectively, across diets. The pH decreased slightly by 0.10 pH unit between treatments D0 and D56 with an average of 6.58. Nevertheless, the time during which physicochemical parameters remained at nadir value after feeding varied with diets: 2 and 7 h for D0 and 6 and 5 h for D56, respectively for pH and Eh. Moreover, fermentative parameters were altered by treatments: total VFA and NH3-N were greater in D56 (72.2 mM and 17.5 mg/100 ml) compared with D0 (65.2 mM and 14.2 mg/100 ml). However, neither the structure of bacterial populations of the rumen nor the diversity index (Shannon) was altered by treatments.

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Copyright © The Animal Consortium 2010

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Effects of varying proportions of concentrates on ruminal-reducing power and bacterial community structure in dry dairy cows fed hay-based diets
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