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Part IV - Understanding Others

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 October 2016

Sukhvinder S. Obhi
Affiliation:
McMaster University, Ontario
Emily S. Cross
Affiliation:
Bangor University
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Chapter
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Shared Representations
Sensorimotor Foundations of Social Life
, pp. 311 - 436
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

References

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