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Chapter 51 - The Febrile Child

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 July 2018

Rachel L. Chin
Affiliation:
University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine
Bradley W. Frazee
Affiliation:
University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine
Zlatan Coralic
Affiliation:
University of California, San Francisco
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

References

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Alpern, E. and Henretig, F. Fever in Fleisher, G, Ludwig, S, Bachur, R. G, et al. (eds.), Textbook of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 6th edn. (Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010), pp. 265–75.Google Scholar
Baker, M. D., Bell, L. M., and Avner, J. R. Outpatient management without antibiotics of fever in selected infants. N. Engl. J. Med. 1993; 329(20): 1437–41.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baskin, M. N., O’Rourke, E. J., and Fleisher, G. R. Outpatient treatment of febrile infants 28 to 89 days of age with intramuscular administration of ceftriaxone. J. Pediatr. 1992; 120(1): 22–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dagan, R., Powell, K. R., Hall, C. B., and Menegus, M. A. Identification of infants unlikely to have serious bacterial infection although hospitalized for suspected sepsis. J. Pediatr. 1985; 107(6): 855–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Alpern, E. and Henretig, F. Fever in Fleisher, G, Ludwig, S, Bachur, R. G, et al. (eds.), Textbook of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 6th edn. (Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010), pp. 265–75.Google Scholar
Baker, M. D., Bell, L. M., and Avner, J. R. Outpatient management without antibiotics of fever in selected infants. N. Engl. J. Med. 1993; 329(20): 1437–41.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baskin, M. N., O’Rourke, E. J., and Fleisher, G. R. Outpatient treatment of febrile infants 28 to 89 days of age with intramuscular administration of ceftriaxone. J. Pediatr. 1992; 120(1): 22–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dagan, R., Powell, K. R., Hall, C. B., and Menegus, M. A. Identification of infants unlikely to have serious bacterial infection although hospitalized for suspected sepsis. J. Pediatr. 1985; 107(6): 855–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Additional Readings

Alpern, E. and Henretig, F. Fever in Fleisher, G, Ludwig, S, Bachur, R. G, et al. (eds.), Textbook of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 6th edn. (Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010), pp. 265–75.Google Scholar
Baker, M. D., Bell, L. M., and Avner, J. R. Outpatient management without antibiotics of fever in selected infants. N. Engl. J. Med. 1993; 329(20): 1437–41.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baskin, M. N., O’Rourke, E. J., and Fleisher, G. R. Outpatient treatment of febrile infants 28 to 89 days of age with intramuscular administration of ceftriaxone. J. Pediatr. 1992; 120(1): 22–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dagan, R., Powell, K. R., Hall, C. B., and Menegus, M. A. Identification of infants unlikely to have serious bacterial infection although hospitalized for suspected sepsis. J. Pediatr. 1985; 107(6): 855–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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