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Emergency Management of Infectious Diseases
  • 2nd edition
  • Edited by Rachel L. Chin, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine , Bradley W. Frazee, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine , Zlatan Coralic, University of California, San Francisco
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Book description

Diagnosis and management of infectious disease are among the most common and challenging aspects of emergency practice. Ranging from surgical treatment of a minor skin abscess to recognition of a rare tropical disease in a returning traveler to rapid resuscitation of a patient in septic shock, these problems will be familiar to every practicing acute care provider. Written by both infectious disease experts and practicing emergency physicians, this book is designed specifically for the acute care provider. It covers the most important pathogens and the most common clinical syndromes, organized by system and by special patient populations. The book features a comprehensive narrative, as well as high-yield tables covering key points on diagnosis and treatment. High quality color photographs assist with visual diagnosis. This book provides an invaluable resource for every practicing clinician who confronts the spectrum of infectious disease in the acute care setting.

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