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  • ISSN: 0079-497X (Print), 2050-2729 (Online)
  • Editor: Dr Julie Gardiner The Prehistoric Society
The Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society (PPS) bring the latest results of research into prehistory to a worldwide audience. Global in scope and ranging in time from the earliest traces of human activity to the advent of written history, the Proceedings offer an authoritative yet accessible account of our distant past.

The predecessor to PPS, Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society of East Anglia (published between 1911 and 1934), is available on a separate page. Click here to access this.


Europa 2022: a message from the President of the Prehistoric Society, Clive Gamble

I write this invitation to our Europa Conference as the tragedy in Ukraine unfolds. The study of our prehistoric past has always united archaeologists and all those interested in deep history. Our Europa Prize was founded by Sir Grahame Clark thirty years ago to honour the contribution of outstanding prehistorians to our subject. This year we will be celebrating the lifetime achievements of Hungarian archaeologist Professor Eszter Bánffy (German Archaeological Institute) at our Europa Conference at Bournemouth University, 17–19 June 2022. Her recent volume First Farmers of the Carpathian Basin: Changing Patterns in Subsistence, Ritual and Monumental Figurines appeared as Prehistoric Society Research Paper number 8 in 2019

Europa Conference 2022 Sans frontières: mobility and networks in Neolithic Europe will affirm in ways we could not envisage during its planning that Europe will never be divided. I look forward to welcoming you to hear our distinguished speakers and their latest insights on a formative period in European society. This year we will be able to meet in-person for the first time at either a conference or day-meeting since 2019. Prehistory has never mattered more.


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