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Time-dependent mechanical properties of rat femoral cortical bone by nanoindentation: An age-related study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2014

Sebastián Jaramillo Isaza*
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Engineering, Laboratoire de Biomécanique et Bioingénierie, UMR CNRS-UTC 7338, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Compiègne Cedex 60205, France
Pierre-Emmanuel Mazeran
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Systems, Laboratoire Roberval Unité de Recherche en Mécanique, UMR CRNS-UTC 7337, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Compiègne Cedex 60205, France
Karim El Kirat
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Engineering, Laboratoire de Biomécanique et Bioingénierie, UMR CNRS-UTC 7338, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Compiègne Cedex 60205, France
Marie-Christine Ho Ba Tho*
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Engineering, Laboratoire de Biomécanique et Bioingénierie, UMR CNRS-UTC 7338, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Compiègne Cedex 60205, France
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: marie-christine.hobatho@utc.fr
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Abstract

The aim of this study is to assess the time-dependent mechanical properties of rat femoral cortical bone in a lifespan model from growth to senescence. New nanoindentation protocol was performed to assess the time-dependent mechanical behavior. The experimental data were fitted with an elastic–viscoelastic–plastic–viscoplastic mechanical model allowing the calculus of the mechanical properties. Variation of mechanical response of bone as a function of the strain rate and age were highlighted. The most representative variations of the mechanical properties with age were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001) from 1 to 4 months for elastic properties, from 1 to 9 months for viscoelastic properties and during all lifespan for plastic and viscoplastic properties, highlighting different maturation ages for elastic, viscoelastic, plastic and viscoplastic behaviors. These results suggest that different physical–chemical and structural processes occur at different ages reflecting bone modeling and remodeling activities in the rat's whole lifespan.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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