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Nano-TiB2 reinforced ultrafine-grained pure Al produced by flux-assisted synthesis and asymmetrical rolling

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2014

Zhiming Li*
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China; and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA
Dong Chen*
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
Haowei Wang
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
Enrique J. Lavernia
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA
Aidang Shan
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
*
a)Address all correspondence to these authors. e-mail: li-zhiming@hotmail.com
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Abstract

In situ nano-TiB2 reinforced ultrafine-grained (UFG) Al composites were prepared via combined processes of flux-assisted synthesis (FAS) and asymmetrical rolling (ASR). The UFG Al composite with an ASR reduction ratio of 97% exhibits an average matrix grain size of 380 nm and an average TiB2 particulate size of 50 nm. Dislocation density in the composites is higher than that corresponding to the high purity (99.99 wt%) Al under identical processing conditions. The yield and ultimate tensile strength values of the UFG Al composites processed with an ASR reduction ratio of 97% are approximately 9 and 5 times higher relative to those of the initial coarse-grained Al, respectively. Moreover, the UFG Al composite with an ASR reduction ratio of 97% exhibits a higher elongation than that corresponding to the UFG pure Al under identical processing conditions, suggesting that nanoparticulates contribute to the overall plastic deformation when the matrix grains are refined to the UFG regime. Moreover, analysis of the strengthening behavior reveals no clear evidence that Orowan strengthening contributes significantly to the overall yield strength of the Al nanocomposites studied herein.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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Nano-TiB2 reinforced ultrafine-grained pure Al produced by flux-assisted synthesis and asymmetrical rolling
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