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Engineering of porous bacterial cellulose toward human fibroblasts ingrowth for tissue engineering

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2014

Yang Hu*
Affiliation:
Center for Human Tissue and Organs Degeneration and Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Biomedical Materials, Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China; Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Center for Nanocellulosics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA; and Fiber and Biopolymer Research Institute, Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79403, USA
Jeffrey M. Catchmark
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Center for Nanocellulosics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
Yongjun Zhu
Affiliation:
Center for Human Tissue and Organs Degeneration and Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Biomedical Materials, Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China
Noureddine Abidi
Affiliation:
Fiber and Biopolymer Research Institute, Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79403, USA
Xin Zhou
Affiliation:
Center for Human Tissue and Organs Degeneration and Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Biomedical Materials, Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China
Jinhui Wang
Affiliation:
Center for Human Tissue and Organs Degeneration and Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Biomedical Materials, Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China
Nuanyi Liang
Affiliation:
Center for Human Tissue and Organs Degeneration and Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Biomedical Materials, Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: yang.hu@siat.ac.cn
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Abstract

From the view of tissue engineering, the deficiency in porosity has impeded further application of bacterial cellulose (BC) as a super biomaterial. In this study, we used a combination method consisting of acetic acid treatment and freeze-drying operation to improve the porous profile of BC, as well as a simple and fast method to measure the thickness, density, and porosity of BC. Results have shown a significant improvement in the porosity of the inner structure of BC treated with acetic acid and freeze-drying. Microscopic observation by scanning electron microscopy exhibited explicit evidences that more orderly porous layer-by-layer structures and more pores were formed along the cross section of modified BC as compared with the control. The enhancement of mechanical properties and crystallinity of modified BC was also demonstrated due to the improvement of material porosity in the particular extent from 50.3 to 76.43%. Cell culture of human fibroblast cells exhibited good cell viability on modified BC, suggesting that a better porous profile of BC on the surface and cross section helps facilitate cells to attach, as well as potentially promotes cells to grow in. These significant results may open the possibility of producing BC nanomaterials for tissue engineering with desirable properties.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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References

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