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The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic
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Book description

The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic examines all aspects of Roman history and civilization from 509 to 49 BC. The key development of the republican period was Rome's rise from a small city to a wealthy metropolis, which served as the international capital of an extensive Mediterranean empire. These centuries produced a classic republican political culture, closely associated with the growth of a world empire. They also witnessed the slow disintegration of republican government under the relentless and combined pressure of external commitments, growing internal dissension, and the boundless ambition of successful military leaders. In the second edition of this Companion volume, distinguished European, Canadian, and American scholars present a variety of lively current approaches to understanding the political, military, and social aspects of Roman history, as well as its literary and visual culture. The second edition includes a new introduction, three new chapters on population, slavery, and the rise of empire, and updated bibliographies and maps.

Reviews

Praise for the first edition:'This … is a helpful textbook for students, providing a general survey of, and clear introduction to, many of the central issues of this period. I feel sure that many students and their teachers will find individual chapters in this volume a good starting point for the study of specific topics.'

Source: Scripta Classica Israelica

Praise for the first edition:'Designed to be accessible to students and the general reader alike this book is warmly recommended to anyone interested in a vital, formative period of Roman history.'

Source: Arctos

Praise for the first edition:'This is a first rate and across the board introduction to the Roman Republic. All articles are written in a clear and easy to read language, and all authors are mindful of the fact that they should be addressing a reading public that may be non-expert but is genuinely interested in Roman things.'

Source: Ordia Prima

Praise for the first edition:'This is a dynamic, well-written book which contains a considerable amount of information, but remains easy to read.'

Source: Classics Ireland

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Contents


Page 1 of 2


  • 2: - Power and Process under the Republican “Constitution”
    pp 19-53
  • 6: - Women in the Roman Republic
    pp 127-148

Page 1 of 2


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