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Trade and Civilisation Trade and Civilisation
Economic Networks and Cultural Ties, from Prehistory to the Early Modern Era
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Five - Interlocking Commercial Networks and the Infrastructure of Trade in Western Asia during the Bronze Age

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 July 2018

Kristian Kristiansen
Affiliation:
Göteborgs Universitet, Sweden
Thomas Lindkvist
Affiliation:
Göteborgs Universitet, Sweden
Janken Myrdal
Affiliation:
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
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Trade and Civilisation
Economic Networks and Cultural Ties, from Prehistory to the Early Modern Era
, pp. 113 - 142
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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