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Chapter 11 - Zona Binding: Competitive Sperm-Binding Assay

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2021

Ashok Agarwal
Affiliation:
The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
Ralf Henkel
Affiliation:
University of the Western Cape, South Africa
Ahmad Majzoub
Affiliation:
Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha
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Summary

Today, about 10–15 percent of couples at reproductive age worldwide are infertile and they are unable to conceive naturally without medical assistance. Infertility can be caused by male-only factors, female-only factors or a combination of both. However, the cause of infertility is currently unidentifiable in about 20–30 percent of patients, who are classified as “unexplained infertility”. Currently, there is a lack of effective medical treatment for most infertile couples to achieve natural pregnancy. Although assisted reproductive technology (ART) such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) are popular and effective procedures to treat both female and male factor infertility, they are very expensive and not always successful. Some patients require several attempts of treatment cycles to achieve a pregnancy and bear huge financial and emotional costs in the process.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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