Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-clkrv Total loading time: 0.49 Render date: 2022-01-18T21:05:02.344Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

7 - The acquisition of nouns and verbs in Japanese

from Language acquisition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Yuriko Oshima-Takane
Affiliation:
Professor of Psychology, McGill University
Mineharu Nakayama
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
Reiko Mazuka
Affiliation:
Duke University, North Carolina
Yasuhiro Shirai
Affiliation:
Cornell University, New York
Ping Li
Affiliation:
University of Richmond, Virginia
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Acquisition of form class categories such as nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions, etc. is an important step toward mastery of adult language. In particular, nouns and verbs are essential elements of a sentence and how children identify them in input has been a central issue in language acquisition research. Several theorists emphasize the importance of object words as an initial entry point into a language system. For instance, Gentner (1982) proposes the Natural Partitioning hypothesis, which claims that nouns are learned earlier than verbs because they are universally more accessible to children than verbs. Concepts denoted by concrete nouns are already formed as perceptually cohesive packages (e.g. concrete objects, persons, etc.) before word learning begins, while those denoted by verbs (e.g. action, events, and change of states) are crosslinguistically more variable and must be learned through a specific language. Markman (1990) proposes lexical constraints such as whole object and taxonomic constraints that initially guide children to acquire object words over action words. As a result, children show a noun bias in early vocabularies.

Although a prevalence of nouns over verbs in the early productive vocabularies of English-speaking children has been widely reported in the literature (e.g. Goldfield, 2000), the claim of a universal early noun bias has been challenged by recent findings from Korean and Mandarin studies and has become the focus of intense controversy.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×