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Case 34 - sCJD with Negative 14–3–3?

from Part 7 - Misinterpreting Test Results

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Keith Josephs
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Federico Rodriguez-Porcel
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
Rhonna Shatz
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Daniel Weintraub
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Alberto Espay
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
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Summary

This 79-year-old left-handed woman presented after six months of progressive cognitive and behavioral changes. She rapidly became forgetful and easily confused, irritable, and had delusional thinking of people trying to harm her emerging over two weeks. Within three months, her language declined to the point where she couldn’t follow commands or produce intelligible or coherent speech. Her balance and walking declined, rendering her wheelchair bound. Her prior medication regimen consisted of amlodipine and atorvastatin, with no changes in recent years.

Type
Chapter
Information
Common Pitfalls in Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 107 - 109
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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McGuire, L. I. et al. 2012. RT-QuIC analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Ann Neurol 72(2) 278285.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Vitali, P. et al. 2011. Diffusion-weighted MRI hyperintensity patterns differentiate CJD from other rapid dementias. Neurology 76(20) 17111719.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zeidler, M. and Green, A. 2004. Advances in diagnosing Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease with MRI and CSF 14–3–3 protein analysis. Neurology 63(3) 410411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zerr, I. et al. 1996. Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of cerebrospinal fluid. The Lancet 348(9031) 846849.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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