Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-sjtt6 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-20T17:06:49.906Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Case 7 - Remembering That We Forget versus Forgetting Altogether

from Part 2 - Misidentifying the Impaired Cognitive Domain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Keith Josephs
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Federico Rodriguez-Porcel
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
Rhonna Shatz
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Daniel Weintraub
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Alberto Espay
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Get access

Summary

We discuss cases where overrliance on ancillary studies and overlooking the clinical picture were asssociated with misdiagnosis.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Agosta, F. et al. 2015. MRI signatures of the frontotemporal lobar degeneration continuum. Hum Brain Mapp 7 26022614.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beck, J. et al. 2008. A distinct clinical, neuropsychological and radiological phenotype is associated with progranulin gene mutations in a large UK series. Brain 131(Pt 3) 706720.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Budson, A. E. 2009. Understanding memory dysfunction. Neurologist 15(2) 7179.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dickerson, B. C. and Eichenbaum, H. 2010. The episodic memory system: neurocircuitry and disorders. Neuropsychopharmacology 35(1) 86104.Google Scholar
Hornberger, M. et al. 2010. How preserved is episodic memory in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia? Neurology 74(6) 472479.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kelley, B. J. et al. 2010. Alzheimer disease–like phenotype associated with the c.154delA mutation in progranulin. Arch Neurol 67(2) 171177.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Le Ber, I. et al. 2008. Phenotype variability in progranulin mutation carriers: a clinical, neuropsychological, imaging and genetic study. Brain 131(Pt 3) 732746.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mendez, M. F. and Shapira, J. S. 2005. Loss of insight and functional neuroimaging in frontotemporal dementia. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 17(3) 413416.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pressman, P. S. and Miller, B. L. 2014. Diagnosis and management of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Biol Psychiatry 75(7) 574581.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rademakers, R. et al. 2007. Phenotypic variability associated with progranulin haploinsufficiency in patients with the common 1477C–<T (Arg493X) mutation: an international initiative. Lancet Neurol 6(10) 857868.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rascovsky, K. et al. 2011. Sensitivity of revised diagnostic criteria for the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia. Brain 134(Pt 9) 24562477.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Seelaar, H. et al. 2011. Clinical, genetic and pathological heterogeneity of frontotemporal dementia: a review. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 82(5) 476486.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Whitwell, J. L. et al. 2012. Neuroimaging signatures of frontotemporal dementia genetics: C9ORF72, tau, progranulin and sporadics. Brain 135(Pt 3) 794806.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×