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34 - Capnography and the single-path model applied to cardiac output recovery and airway structure and function

from 1 - Ventilation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2011

J. S. Gravenstein
Affiliation:
University of Florida
Michael B. Jaffe
Affiliation:
Philip Healthcare
Nikolaus Gravenstein
Affiliation:
University of Florida
David A. Paulus
Affiliation:
University of Florida
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Summary

This chapter presents the single-path model (SPM)-based, non-invasive method for simultaneously estimating cardiac output (QB) and mixed venous PCO2 (CB), solely from breath-to-breath carbon dioxide (SBCO2) washouts in the form of volumetric capnograms. Quantitative analysis of the accumulated expired CO2 waveform using the SPM allows the calculation of a number of variables relevant to the monitoring of respiratory efficiency and the relationship between ventilation and pulmonary perfusion. The accuracy of this SPM-based method for cardiac output estimation may be diminished for various physiological condition anomalies. If pulmonary blood shunts are present, parts of the lung will not be perfused evenly, thus causing a derangement of the ventilation-perfusion relationship. It is interesting to speculate that alveolar airway smooth muscle may function to change, and thereby change airway as a means of modulating gas exchange between the atmosphere and the alveoli.
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Capnography , pp. 347 - 359
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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